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    #1

    buy in

    Would you please explain the following in red more easily?

    Lack of commitment: When people feel their input has not been properly considered and that they have not been properly involved in decisions, they have no buy in. They do not commit to the final decisions.

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: buy in

    [not a teacher]

    In management and decision making, buy-in (as a verb or noun) signifies the commitment of interested or affected parties to a decision (often called stakeholders) to 'buy in' to the decision, that is, to agree to give it support, often by having been involved in its formulation. - source

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    #3

    Re: buy in

    On a releated note, what is this all about?

    Phrasal Verb: Buy in:
    Meaning: Force a CD or record into the charts by buying lots of copies
    Example: Joe Meek's last hit, 'Singin' the Blues', was probably BOUGHT IN at number 40, but failed to go any higher.


    Is that correct? Seems like a very specific meaning. I've heard of "payola", but not "buy in" used like this.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: buy in

    The concrete (simple, basic) meaning of 'buying in' is spending money to participate in a joint venture: We all want it. There are 10 of us. It costs $1000. Will you buy in to the venture, by paying $100?

    The figurative use of 'buy in' - as it is used here - is (as the writer says in his last sentence) commitment.

    b
    Last edited by Barb_D; 16-Feb-2012 at 19:58. Reason: (format fix)

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    #5

    Re: buy in

    I get it.

    Many thanks.

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