Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. sky3120's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jan 2012
    • Posts: 428
    #1

    such as

    "Jill would love to travel to several European cities such as London, Florence, and Athens". (The “such as” tells us these are specific cities Jill wants to see.)

    For further clarification, let’s go back to an earlier example: “Jill would love to travel to several European cities” is a main clause (it conveys a complete thought), and the phrase “such as London, Florence, and Athens” gives additional but nonessential information; therefore—according to many style guides and writers’ handbooks— a comma is needed before “such as.” Many writers, however, intentionally break that usage rule to avoid bumpy comma-crowding.


    What those explanations above mean? So do I need to add a "comma" behind "several European cities" or both are okay but there is a meaning difference? I think it is also about restrictive and non-restrictive clauses.

    This will be the last question related to this grammar. Please help me again.

    Source:Grammar Girl : "Like" Versus "Such As" :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,629
    #2

    Re: such as

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    "Jill would love to travel to several European cities such as London, Florence, and Athens". (The “such as” tells us these are specific cities Jill wants to see.)

    For further clarification, let’s go back to an earlier example: “Jill would love to travel to several European cities” is a main clause (it conveys a complete thought), and the phrase “such as London, Florence, and Athens” gives additional but nonessential information; therefore—according to many style guides and writers’ handbooks— a comma is needed before “such as.” Many writers, however, intentionally break that usage rule to avoid bumpy comma-crowding.


    What those explanations above mean? So do I need to add a "comma" behind "several European cities" or both are okay but there is a meaning difference? I think it is also about restrictive and non-restrictive clauses.

    This will be the last question related to this grammar. Please help me again.

    Source:Grammar Girl : "Like" Versus "Such As" :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™
    I would put a comma after "cities".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2012
    • Posts: 902
    #3

    Re: such as

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    What those explanations above mean? So do I need to add a "comma" behind "several European cities" or both are okay but there is a meaning difference?
    [not a teacher]

    according to many style guides and writers’ handbooks— a comma is needed before “such as.” - Means "officially", you need a comma here "... cities, such as ...".

    Many writers, however, intentionally break that usage rule to avoid bumpy comma-crowding. - Means lots of people will knowingly (i.e. on purpose) not include the comma, to make it look "cleaner".

    IMO, there is exactly NO difference in meaning, when using the comma here or not.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •