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    #1

    there and used to

    Hi,

    There used to be a cinema over there. (It is OK)

    Is it possible to constuct a sentence as the following sentence?

    -Did there use to be a cinema over there?
    -Yes, there did.

    Thanks...

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: there and used to

    I would say it is.

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    #3

    Re: there and used to

    'Yes, it is' means 'yes, it is right', is that right?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: there and used to

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    'Yes, it is' means 'yes, it is right', is that right?
    You asked, "Is it possible to construct a sentence as the following sentence?"
    I responded, "I would say it is", i.e., I would say it is possible.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: there and used to

    I think a sentence of the form "Didn't there use to be a cinema over there?" would be more common.
    And more common still would be, "Wasn't there a cinema over there?"
    I say that the negative sentence is more common because it would be said by someone remembering something from the past. This would be a more common situation than someone postulating that perhaps there used to be a cinema over there.

    A sentence such as "Didn't you use to dance every Saturday night?" can't be changed to "Wasn't ..." Maybe "Weren't you once a regular dancer?"

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    #6

    Re: there and used to

    -Didn't there use to be a cinema over there?
    -No, there wasn't.

    Can we give an answer like that instead of 'no, there didn't'?

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: there and used to

    That's fine.
    So is "No, it used to be a car-wash. The cinema you're thinking of was on Chestnut."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: there and used to

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    -Didn't there use to be a cinema over there?
    -No, there wasn't.

    Can we give an answer like that instead of 'no, there didn't'?
    Yes. And "Did there use to be be ...?"; "Yes, there was" is also possible.

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