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    #1

    Traditional name

    I am Asian. I have an Asian name, but it isn't that popular and it hasn't existed for a long time (it has been around for about 35 years). Would you say I have a traditional name?

    Many thanks

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    #2

    Re: Traditional name

    Can anyone help me with this, please?

    Thank you so much.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Traditional name

    If it's only been around for 35 years, I wouldn't call it a traditional name.

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    #4

    Re: Traditional name

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominoes View Post
    it hasn't existed for a long time (it has been around for about 35 years)
    [not a teacher]

    The above seems contradictory, which makes it hard to answer.

    "it hasn't existed for a long time" This means it is (long) out of use. Is it?

    "it has been around for about 35 years This means it is a new name. Is it?

    It can't be both.

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    #5

    Re: Traditional name

    Now that you point it out, I can see that "It hasn't existed for a long time" is ambiguous. I had no trouble understanding it to mean "Its existance is not of long duration" but it could also read "It stop existing a long time ago."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Traditional name

    I also read "It hasn't existed for a long time" to mean that it fell out of use a long time ago, but the further information about it having been around for 35 years made me go back and then I recognised the alternative meaning. I probably would have said "it hasn't existed for very long". I wouldn't consider it traditional either. I would perhaps just say it was a standard or common name, unless it's an unusual name.

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    #7

    Re: Traditional name

    Thank you for your responses. I think it's great that you give up your time to answer people's questions.

    With regard to my sentence "it hasn't existed for a long time", is it incorrect in the context, or is it that it could be interpreted in two ways? I'm constantly trying to improve my English. I really appreciate your answers :) Thank you.

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    #8

    Re: Traditional name

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominoes View Post

    With regard to my sentence "it hasn't existed for a long time", is it incorrect in the context, or is it that it could be interpreted in two ways?
    Take a look at what was already said and see if you might already have an answer:
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I can see that "It hasn't existed for a long time" is ambiguous. I had no trouble understanding it to mean "Its existance is not of long duration" ...
    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    ... but the further information about it having been around for 35 years made me go back and then I recognised the alternative meaning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: Traditional name

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Take a look at what was already said and see if you might already have an answer:
    Thanks :) Silly me!

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