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    #1

    pet-sitting

    What kind of business is "pet-sitting" ? How does it work? What area is popular to run the busniness?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: pet-sitting

    It's the same as baby-sitting, but you look after a domestic animal (pet) instead of a baby.
    I assume that it could work in a whole lot of ways, depending on your business model. I would choose an area where there are many pets and pet-owners, and where those owners are wealthy.

    PS: It could also be somewhat different from baby-sitting in that owners might leave pets for weeks while they go on holidays, but that is usually referred to as putting your pet into a pet hotel. I guess it would be unusual to get someone to live in your home for weeks just to look after your pet. A next-door neighbour who calls in once a day to feed the animal while the owners are away might also be called a pet-sitter.

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    #3

    Re: pet-sitting

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    while they go on holidays, but that is usually referred to as putting your pet into a pet hotel.

    I've never heard of "pet hotel". In AmE, we would board a pet in a kennel.

    I guess it would be unusual to get someone to live in your home for weeks just to look after your pet. A next-door neighbour who calls in once a day to feed the animal while the owners are away might also be called a pet-sitter.

    In AmE, we use pet-sitter in this case, but we also might say house sitter.
    [not a teacher]

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: pet-sitting

    Being a house sitter does not, in itself, mean that one is necessarily looking after pets.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: pet-sitting

    If you looked in my "contacts" list on my phone, you'd find our pet sitter. When we are away for more than a long weekend, she comes about every other day to scoop our the litter boxes, freshen their water, etc. (We have a continuous feeder so food isn't the issue.) She wasn't crazy about feeding the lizard, but she did that too. And she'd sit with them for a little bit and give them some love. If I asked her to, I'm sure she would water plants and maybe change which lights are left on, but I haven't dont that. I would never hire a pet sitter who didn't come recommended by a friend, since this person has a key to your house and knows how long you'll be gone.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: pet-sitting

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Being a house sitter does not, in itself, mean that one is necessarily looking after pets.
    As I said
    A next-door neighbour who calls in once a day to feed the animal while the owners are away might also be called a pet-sitter.
    might also be, or instead, called a house-sitter.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: pet-sitting

    In the UK, a house-sitter generally actually lives in your house while you're away on holiday or even in hospital or something. If you have a pet they would of course look after the pet as well, but the main purpose of having them there would be to ensure the security of your house. We wouldn't refer to someone who just pops into check everything is OK as a house-sitter. I don't actually think we have a word for that!

    A pet-sitter, however, might live in your house specifically in order to look after your pet and might perhaps do a few things around the house as an aside. However, someone who pops in once a day to feed the cat/fish/hamster/snake etc might also be referred to as a pet-sitter. One of my friends runs such a business and calls herself a "moggie minder"!

    I think that people who have a dog as a pet would be more likely to want someone to stay in the house the whole time as dogs need more care. With cats and smaller animals, having someone come in once a day is usually sufficient!

    Boarding kennels for cats or dogs in the UK are sometimes referred to as pet hotels. As far as I can tell, this is just so that the owners can charge more!

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    #8

    Re: pet-sitting

    It could be unique to me, or my social circle, or my geography, but I've often heard and said "house sitting" when just popping in for a friend.

    1: You busy this afternoon?
    2: I am from 3 to about 4; I'm house sitting for my neighbors while they're in Orlando.

    I would never say pet sitting here, if I was popping in and out. To me, pet sitting means full time care; either the pet is with me, or I am staying over pretty much full time to keep the pet company and to fill the vacant house. Also, while I'm sure someone somewhere in the US will charge for house sitting, I've never come across it. Pet sitting (and boarding and walking), on the other hand, is a thriving business.

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