Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Lithuanian
      • Home Country:
      • Lithuania
      • Current Location:
      • Lithuania

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 209
    #1

    Reading multi-choice.

    Living Dangerously
    People cross continents to bungee jump off the Victoria Falls in Africa


    Bungee jumping is not new. Millions of people have jumped from high places with elastic tied to their ankles, but until recently, not me. There are plenty of places to try a jump, some no great distance from my home. Unlike my friends, however, I was looking for a better view than that from crane in a London suburb, so I chose one of the world's classic bungee location; I jumped from the bridge which crosses the Victoria Falls in central Africa. And I learned something from the experience: I discovered that I am scared of heights.

    At the falls, one of the world's top bungee operators arranges for a steady stream of tourists to throw themselves off the bridge. They even have to queue for the privilege. This queue, you might imagine, would be a good place to build up your confidence, as you watch the brave people ahead of you successfully complete the challenge. In practice. it gives you time to lose your nerve. Not least because those in front, as far as you can see, jump off the bridge and are never seen again. I discovered later that they are pulled back up and clipped on the lower part of the bridge, out of sight of those waiting to jump.

    The jumper in front of me, a young girl, was obviously terrified. Two employees helped her toward the jump point, but while her feet were edging forwards, the rest of her body was saying, chicken out and sat down to get her legs untied. Although her refusal had been recorded on video camera, she didn't appear ashamed more relieved as far as I could see.

    My sympathy for her increased as my turn got closer. All loose possessions were removed from my pockets, and a harness was tightened around my body. This is just for your security, I was told, but I didn't feel greatly reassured. Then it was my turn sit down. My ankles were tied together and the length of elastic was attached. The waiting, at least was over and for that I was grateful. Helpers on either side led me to the edge. Looking down, I suddently felt real fear.

    The water of the River Zambezi were far below, one hundred metres below according to the brochure. Although I never once let go of the grab rails, my helpers encouraged me to gradually move my feet forward until I reached the edge of the metal step that stood between me and the drop. At this point, if I'd had the courage, I might have backed out. There were only 30 people watching, none of whom I was likely to see again. I could live with the disappointment and I knew the employess weren't allowed to push me. But my rational mind talked me around. Thousands of people had done this jump and survived to tell the tale. I took a deep breath, spread out my arms and toppled forwards.

    I found myself dropping face forwards into space. Then, there was a tug on my legs. Slowing me gently as neared the river's surface And then I was being pulled back up again - and then dropping again, and so it continued. Strangely the fear hadn't gone when a man on rope pulled up onto the safety of solid ground. Luckily, I landed on the Zambian side of the river, where I was staying in a hotel. I was glad that I didn't have to walk across the bridge. Even though it was wide, with a high railing, I just didn't want to go anywhere near that one hundred metre drop ever again.

    1. According to the writer, what was the disadvantage of the queue?

    A. You could see how people felt after they'd jumped.
    B. It meant that other people were waiting for you to jump.
    c. You could see how confident the other jumpers were.
    D. It meant you had the change to change your mind.

    2. According to the writer, how did they young girl seem to feel about her experience?

    A. Embarrassed by her lack of courage.
    B. Glad that the whole thing was over.
    C. Pleased that her attempt had been filmed.
    D. Disappointed to have wasted an opportunity.

    3. How did the writer feel while the equipment was being fitted?

    A. Relieved that this turn had come.
    B. Impressed by the safety procedures.
    C. Grateful for the help he was given.
    D. Concerned about his possessions.

    4. What are the "grab rails" line (line 48) designed to do?

    A. Stop your feet slipping.
    B. Keep you moving forwards.
    C. Provide you with support.
    D. Stop you looking down.

    5. What made the writer jump the end?

    A. It was better than being pushed.
    B. He realised that he had no real choice.
    C. It was better than looking silly.
    D. He realised there was no great danger.

    6. "it" in line 66 refers to.

    A. A feeling of fear.
    B. The bridge.
    C. A feeling of safety.
    D. The rope.

    So, this reading exercise is my homework, but it's too hard to me, because reading exercises confuse me even though I understand this test perfectly.

    If I did a typo please don't judge me =)

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: Reading multi-choice.

    Please don't ask us to do or correct your homework; this is a place to discuss language.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Lithuanian
      • Home Country:
      • Lithuania
      • Current Location:
      • Lithuania

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 209
    #3

    Re: Reading multi-choice.

    I know, but one time please make a good job =) Please I wrote everything from paper I put in lots of job.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: Reading multi-choice.

    Please don't ask us again to do or correct your homework; this is a place to discuss language.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,814
    #5

    Re: Reading multi-choice.

    Quote Originally Posted by JustAlilBit View Post
    I know, but one time please make a good job =) Please I wrote everything from paper I put in lots of work. .
    We would be more likely to consider helping at all if you had attempted to answer even one question. Here is a clue. The answer to question 1 can be found in the following words: "This queue, you might imagine, would be a good place to build up your confidence, as you watch the brave people ahead of you successfully complete the challenge. In practice. it gives you time to lose your nerve."

    What do you think the answer is?

    I am not going to do this with every question but see if you can now do question 1. This is your homework and if it is too difficult, then your teacher needs to know that he/she is setting homework which is above your level.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] Multi-pronged versus multi-faceted
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2009, 23:55
  2. multi-component
    By trapanipalermo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Mar-2008, 19:14
  3. Release from a choice or free from a choice
    By José Manuel Rosón Bravo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-Mar-2007, 22:29
  4. graded reading materials or authentic reading material?
    By antemeridiem in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Nov-2004, 10:09
  5. multi-layered
    By takashi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2004, 12:43

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •