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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #1

    Not true with me

    Hello.

    Say, a friend of mine have made a statement and I want to reply saying that I don't agree with it, while admitting that there may be others points of view. What should I say? I have these 3 options (just my assumptions):

    1. Not true, to me.
    2. Not true for me.
    3. Not true with me.

    I'd appreciate if you'd collaborate on that.
    It'd be terrific if you'd correct any mistakes in this post.

    Thanks, Alex.
    Last edited by AlexAD; 22-Feb-2012 at 21:48. Reason: Correction

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Not true with me

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Hello.

    Say, a friend of mine has made a statement and I want to reply saying that I don't agree with it, while admitting that there may be other points of view. What should I say? I have these 3 options (just my assumptions):

    1. Not true, to me.
    2. Not true for me.
    3. Not true with me.

    I'd appreciate if you'd collaborate on that.
    It'd be terrific if you'd correct any mistakes in this post.

    Thanks, Alex.
    "Not in my opinion" is possible.

  3. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Not true with me

    Well, let me dig deeper into details.

    If I they said, 'Programmers treat computer users like monkeys' and I want to say that 'I am a programmer. I don't treat computer users like that, what would I say then?

    There is nothing bad with 'not in my opinion', but I kept that option in mind.
    Just want to widen my phrasal vocabulary a little bit.

    Regards, Alex.

  4. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Not true with me

    I really hate to start discussing another issue in this thread but I think it would be better than if I created a new thread.
    So, why a friend of mine has not a friend of mine have? I tend to refer to a friend of mine as to they.

    P.S. Oh, I have just noticed that I have reached the 500th post at usingenglish.com Quite a nice figure

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    #5

    Re: Not true with me

    A friend of yours is not a "they" it's a "he" (or "she").

  5. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Not true with me

    But do "they" also refers to "he" (or "she")?
    It seems I don't understand a thing about this they/he/she issue...

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    #7

    Re: Not true with me

    It's pretty basic. "Friend" is singular, third person. So you use the singular, third person form of the verb. "Has" in this case.

    Now, if it was "some friends of mine" it would be plural, third person. "Have."

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Not true with me

    If you did not have a particular friend in mind, just a general concept of a friend, you could use "they" and then the verb "have." However, you used an actual noun, the singular "friend" so the verb has to agree with that.

    That's not the case with me.
    That hasn't been my experience.
    You won't find that to be true with me.
    That doesn't hold true with me.

    (Are you a programmer? One of my favorite abbreviations is PEBKAC ("Problem Exists Between Keyboard And Chair"). In other words, user error.)

    Congratulations on reaching your 500th post.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Not true with me

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    One of my favorite abbreviations is PEBKAC ("Problem Exists Between Keyboard And Chair"). In other words, user error.
    A guy at the IT department in my old job had a similar acronym: PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer.

  8. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Not true with me

    Thanks, everyone.

    Barb_D, thank you for giving a few more examples!

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    A guy at the IT department in my old job had a similar acronym: PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer.
    As to those abbreviations like PEBKAC, PICNIC (actually sounds very good ) I would note that yet me being a programmer, I am quite a sensitive person (as you may have known that from 'Business communication' thread) and I don't use those slang that is so popular amongst my fellow colleagues as it may offend someone. May be it has something to do with culture, but in Russia (and, regretfully, IT guys from Belarus tend to mimic them) they use abbreviations like PICNIC to say to a person that they are dumb, to say them to go away etc.

    There are also examples of these that I hate and when a person use it without being funny (i.e. not putting smiles at the end) it usually dramatically affects my attitude towards them. Here are some of them:

    Google it (When asking very specific question. Oh, God I am aware my good man that there Google exists but if it is all you can say me, you are no help. Why would ask you next time? I'd rather ask somebody more nice).

    Banned on torrents? (When a person usually kindly enough asking to bring some movies. Well, the first one - not everyone has a fast connection. Second, even if it is fast enough it may take a long to download a few movies. What if you are dating a girlfriend and really need them films this night )
    Last edited by AlexAD; 23-Feb-2012 at 04:39.

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