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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    a ten minute walk

    Hello, everyone, I think I knew the rule once how to say it correctly, but I can't recall it now :


    1. I live a ten-minutes walk from the university.
    2. I live a ten-minute walk from the university.
    3. I live a ten-minutes’ walk from the university.
    4. I live a ten-minute’s walk from the university.
    5. I live ten-minutes walk from the university.
    6. I live ten-minute walk from the university.
    7. I live ten-minutes’ walk from the university.
    8. I live ten-minute’s walk from the university.

    Which of the sentences above are correct? Could you help me with the rule?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a ten minute walk

    Either a ten-minute walk or ten minutes' walk.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: a ten minute walk

    Thank you, Barb_D!

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: a ten minute walk

    Thank you for giving your thread a helpful title.

    Let's say you are leaving your job. Here it is customary to let your employer know this two weeks in advance. What two ways could you write about this notice of two weeks?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a ten minute walk

    Using the same principle as with "a five minute walk", I think it'll be as follows:
    1) to give a two week notice
    2) to give two weeks' notice

    And I was surprised to have come across this:
    He has to give 4 weeks of notice before he can leave.
    Is the latter also used? And if so, does it mean the same as 1) and 2)?

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: a ten minute walk

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    Using the same principle as with "a five minute walk", I think it'll be as follows:
    1) to give a two week notice
    2) to give two weeks' notice

    And I was surprised to have come across this:
    He has to give 4 weeks of notice before he can leave.
    Is the latter also used? And if so, does it mean the same as 1) and 2)?
    1) is not natural. It's perfectly grammatical but we don't say it like that.
    I think I've heard your third example, but it's not common IMO.

  7. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: a ten minute walk

    Thank you, bhaisahab!

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