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  1. roseriver1012's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Why the present perfect tense is used here?

    ---I shall not scold you.You are punished enough now. Everyday you have said to yourself,"I have plenty of time,I will learn my lesson tomorrow."---

    What I don't understand about the above sentences is why it is"you have said to yourself" instead of "you say to yourself"? What kind of a role does the present perfect tense play here? Thanks for your response.

  2. roseriver1012's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Why the present perfect tense is used here?


  3. roseriver1012's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Why the present perfect tense is used here?

    why? why? why? why?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Why the present perfect tense is used here?

    The whole thing seems unnatural to me. Where did you find it?

    This would seem slightly less unnatural to me: I am not going not scold you.You have been punished enough. Every day you have said to yourself, "I have plenty of time, I will learn my lesson tomorrow."

    Even that is unnatural. How does the speaker know what the other person has said to themself? Has the other person learnt their lesson next day? If not, how have they been punished enough?

    The present perfect is natural enough - activities that have happened in a period of time leading up to the present.

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