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  1. sky3120's Avatar
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    #1

    it is-that clause

    I know "it is so kind of you to say that" is totally right. Then, instead of "it", can I also say like this, "That is so kind of you to~, or this is so kind of you to~? Is there any meaning or nuance difference among them?

    And one more question. I learned it is-that clause, which is "It is your friend who(that) threw an egg at me". In ths sentence, can I also put "this or that" instead of "it" 'cause I saw those sentences written with this and that before.

    Thanks a million again in advance.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: it is-that clause

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    I know "it is so kind of you to say that" is totally right. Then, instead of "it", can I also say like this, "That is so kind of you to~, or this is so kind of you to~? Is there any meaning or nuance difference among them?

    And one more question. I learned it is-that clause, which is "It is your friend who(that) threw an egg at me". In ths sentence, can I also put "this or that" instead of "it" 'cause I saw those sentences written with this and that before.

    Thanks a million again in advance.
    "That/this is so kind of you to say that" is incorrect. If the person that threw the egg is standing with you and the person you are talking to, you could say "This is your friend that threw an egg". If the person who threw the egg is across the street, you could point and say "That is your friend..."

  3. sky3120's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: it is-that clause

    Thanks. What you mean is that "that or this" can not be subsitiuted for "it" in any cases? Or just the meaning of the exampled sentence does not make sense? I found a sentence, "That's so thoughtful of you to invite us" online. That's why I am confused now. Sorry for being picky.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: it is-that clause

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    Thanks. What you mean is that "that or this" can not be subsitiuted for "it" in any cases? Or just the meaning of the exampled sentence does not make sense? I found a sentence, "That's so thoughtful of you to invite us" online. That's why I am confused now. Sorry for being picky.

    Bhaisahab was making a general point that applied to both your examples. It might be possible to find extreme contexts that would allow the substution of 'that' or 'this', but I can't think of any.

    In speech it is common for one grammatical construction to slide into another one. A speaker might say 'That is so kind of you' meaning to stop there. But seeing a look of incomprehension on the face of the audience they add 'to do that'. People who have learned English entirely by ear may assume that 'it is OK' in that case to say 'That is so kind of you to do that'; but it is really 'That is kind of you ... to do that'.

    What appears on the Internet is of mixed value.

    b

  5. sky3120's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: it is-that clause

    Thank you but still, I am confused, so what you meant is that in formal English, "it" must be put at the subject position, but in spoken English or speech, "that and this" are accepted? Sorry for not being so smart with this grammar.
    Last edited by sky3120; 29-Feb-2012 at 10:39.

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    #6

    Re: it is-that clause

    No, 'that' and 'this' are NOT acceptable in this sentence position!

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: it is-that clause

    I was explaining the mistake, not justifying it

    b

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