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  1. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
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    #1

    Lightbulb to-morrow

    Hello :)

    I've noticed -in some old books- that tomorrow is spelled to-morrow.
    I checked the dictionary, and found out that morrow means "next day".

    So how come "to" was added to it, and why?

    Is it to make it look the same as "today"?
    Was today spelled to-day in the old times?

    Regards.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to-morrow

    Quote Originally Posted by Ducklet Cat View Post
    Hello :)

    I've noticed -in some old books- that tomorrow is spelled to-morrow.
    I checked the dictionary, and found out that morrow means "next day".

    So how come "to" was added to it, and why?

    Is it to make it look the same as "today"?
    Was today spelled to-day in the old times?

    Regards.
    Have a look here: Online Etymology Dictionary

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    #3

    Re: to-morrow

    Yes, you can see in old Bugs Bunny cartoons "to-day."

  3. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to-morrow

    Thank you.

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    #5

    Re: to-morrow

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    To-day
    To-night
    To-morrow



    On this day, I have been very busy, so I have to go to bed early on this night because I have a lot of

    things to do on the morning.

  4. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: to-morrow

    Thanks you all :)

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: to-morrow

    Well spotted! Until MrsK had had enough I used to keep a series of editions of a single dictionary, charting this sort of change (which is still going on*, of course).

    b
    PS* ...as it did hundreds of years ago; the old Latin hoc die turned into hodie - the Latin root for oggi (It), hoy (Sp), hoje (Pg), and [bolstered up by the addition of au jour de - Fr, 'on the day of'] aujourd'hui. Ther must be many others too. {Thinks} I wonder where heute fits in - I feel some research coming on...
    Last edited by BobK; 02-Mar-2012 at 12:09.

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