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Thread: Aussie idiom

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    #1

    Aussie idiom

    Hello,

    What does a person mean when they say "you have a rear way of playing with words"?

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    #2

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Are you sure it wasn't "real way of playing with words."?

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    #3

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Pirimillo View Post
    Hello,

    What does a person mean when they say "you have a rear way of playing with words"?
    Are you sure it's an Aussie idiom? I've never heard it, and it doesn't sound Aussie.
    What's your source?

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    #4

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Are you sure it's an Aussie idiom? I've never heard it, and it doesn't sound Aussie.
    What's your source?
    I don't know about an idiom, but I think the word might have been "rare", not "rear" or "real".

    She has a rare talent.
    You have a rare way of dealing with things.

    It just means "unusual" or "uncommon". I don't think it's particularly Australian though, unless there's a user from Australia here who can think of a particularly Aussie idiom using "rare".

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Aussie idiom

    That's much more likely - 'rare' meaning 'extraordinary/unusual'.

    I agree that it's not particularly Australian, but I've often noticed that languages in a colonial context can be both conservative and innovative - and 'rare' in that sense is almost archaic in Br Eng. Similarly, the word 'contrary' - meaning something like 'argumentative' (which in the UK is known chiefly in the nursery rhyme 'Mary Mary/Quite contrary) - is common in Australian English. In Br Eng, we tend to say 'headstrong', 'opinionated', (informally) 'bloody-minded, 'mischievous', 'argumentative', 'curmudgeonly', 'hard to get on with, 'obstructive, 'obstreperous''.... or whatever near-synonym is most appropriate.
    b
    Last edited by BobK; 01-Mar-2012 at 12:02. Reason: Fix typo and add 'contrary' analogy

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    #6

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Similarly, the word 'contrary' - [...] is common in Australian English.
    b
    I would not have said so. Can you present anything to convince me it's common here?

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    #7

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I would not have said so. Can you present anything to convince me it's common here?
    Only anecdotal evidence. Several Australians that I know use it. Perhaps what I've noticed is a common trait among Australians who have emigrated, or perhaps I'm just wrong.

    b

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    #8

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Hello,

    I could have been a typo be the 'sender'. I think I have it figured out.
    Thanks to all of you.

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