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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    Out came the sun

    When an inversion happens with an adverb in the beginning, why does it have the structure of "Adverb+verb+subject" not "Adverb+subject+verb"? To emphasize the subject of "the sun"?

    ex)Out came the sun through the break of clouds.

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    #2

    Re: Out came the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    When an inversion happens with an adverb in the beginning, why does it have the structure of "Adverb+verb+subject" not "Adverb+subject+verb"? To emphasize the subject of "the sun"?

    ex)Out came the sun through the break of clouds.
    As far as I know, it's an emphasizing form : Adverb (adverbial phrase) + intransitive verb + Subject
    Ex: A nice house stands on the hill. --> On the hill stands a nice house.
    A big frog is sitting on the grass. --> On the grass is sitting a big frog.

  2. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Out came the sun

    I meant why the order is "Ad+V+S" not "Ad+S+V".

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    #4

    Re: Out came the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I meant why the order is "Ad+V+S" not "Ad+S+V".
    It's a structure when you want to emphasize the action ( an intransitive verb )

    Of course you can say: On the hill, a nice house stands
    Or On the grass, a big frog is sitting.
    However, I think when you want to emphasize the adverbial phrases and use them at the beginning of a sentence it's better to use the inversion form : Adverb + intransitive verb + Subject . This type of emphasizing inversion is used with intransitive verbs only. So it's better to say On the grass is sitting a big frog.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Out came the sun

    I already know what you said. I meant not the way it is, but the reason why it is that way. If there's no specific reason, I will give up investigating on that.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Out came the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I already know what you said. I meant not the way it is, but the reason why it is that way. If there's no specific reason, I will give up investigating on that.
    English is like that.

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    #7

    Re: Out came the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    English is like that.
    Correct.

    We are able to say the same thing in many different ways for the sake of variety - often with no particular reason in mind.

    Does that not apply in Korean, keannu?

    Rover

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Out came the sun

    I feel exactly the same way you do when I speak or think in Korean. I don't even know how Korean grammar goes, nor do I wish to know about it in detail as I'm already a fluent Korean speaker. Korean is like naturally breathing for me, but English is not.

    I'm a humble tutor, and whenever I explain some complicated grammar to my students, if I show some impressive reason or analysis, they can understand and memorize it a lot better than merely reading the lines of grammar books. I don't care about logic a lot as I have accepted a lot of things as they are, but for foreigners who don't have chances to acquire English in a natural environment as native speakers, their learning is quite artificial and dull, so it may be helpful (but not everything, I know you have to take many things without logic) to tell them any impressive logic.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Out came the sun

    Sadly, logic (impressive or otherwise) is frequently conspicuous in its absence in the English language.

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Out came the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    When an inversion happens with an adverb in the beginning, why does it have the structure of "Adverb+verb+subject" not "Adverb+subject+verb"? To emphasize the subject of "the sun"?

    ex)Out came the sun through the* break of in the clouds.
    Why not? It does and you know it. That's what matters.

    b

    *PS 'the' is possible, but 'a' would be much more likely

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