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    #1

    Question 'Guinea' vs 'Guineas'

    Hello,

    I am confused by the use of 'guinea' vs 'guineas' in the following dialogue from Garrow's Law (Season 1, Episode 2). It is between 4 min and 6:30 min. Once one person says '25 guinea' and another time he says '25 guineas'. I doubt it that it can be a mistake because of the high quality of this BBC TV drama. Are both usages correct? (The context is that Mr Crespigny accuses his coachman that he stole a harness. And Mr Garrow, who is representing the coachman, asks Mr Cresigny questions (cross-examination?) - I read somewhere that the 'ing' form was not present in earlier English, and indeed, I hardly hear any 'ing' forms in this drama! (except perhaps in 'standing wages') ).


    Thank you

    Mr Garrow (A): When this coachman was engaged, did you make a bargain with him?

    Mr Crespigny (B): I did, of course.

    A: Good. And I will trouble you to state it.

    B: I believe, at first, he asked for 26 guineas. I do not recollect.

    A: This will be very important. I'm afraid I must trouble you to tax your recollection.
    I believe, in the end, the standing wages agreed were to be 22 guineas,
    together with other articles.

    B: Yes.

    A: Yes! Yes. Now we do make progress.

    B: I cannot say.

    A: Do you recollect whether he was to have the old wheels and the old harnesses to make up the sum?

    B: I never allowed old wheels and old harnesses to any coachman!

    A: Well, then, explain to me what those articles were that were to make up the 22 guineas to be 26 guineas?

    B: I believe...I believe I paid him 25 guinea. I do not have such a minute recollection.

    A: A few moments ago, you recollected it perfectly. Now you'll guess away a man's liberty.

    B: 25 guineas.

    A: I understood you. The agreement was 22 guineas a year wages. But what other agreements did you make besides?

    B: I believe there were...boots and breeches and...a number of...a number of etceteras that the coachmen generally have.

    A: Etceteras? Etceteras? An old harness in want of repair, perhaps?

    B: Under the pretence of my giving it to him, he took the plated harness out of my stable.

    A: Upon this man being discharged, did he, by your desire, deliver you an inventory of the things in the stable?

    B: He did.

    A: Good. Do you have the inventory?

    B: Of course I have not.

    A: Ah. What if I was to tell you the old harness is not listed in it.

    B: Impossible!

    A: And if I have here the inventory that proves it?

    [Garrow shows a couple of blank papers to the jury]

    Mr Sylvester: My Lord, this is improper.

    Judge: Mr Garrow, are you attempting to introduce new evidence?


    A: My Lord, I'm merely introducing the face of Mr Crespigny to the jury at this moment. It is my fervent wish that they mark it.

    Judge: Mr Garrow, I will not have such tricks in my court.

    A: My Lord, I apologise for the creation of such a misleading impression.
    But I cannot best Mr Crespigny, who stands before me, in the way of that vice.


  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 'Guinea' vs 'Guineas'

    If guinea works like pound, they are both used.
    "I gave him 25 pounds" = "I gave him 25 pound."

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    #3

    Re: 'Guinea' vs 'Guineas'

    @Raymott, thank you.


    It seems a bit strange that the same person would use different forms in two consecutive sentences. Or another way to look at this is, he (Mr Crespigny) has used 'guineas' before, but then changes it to 'guinea' and then again back to 'guineas'.

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    #4

    Re: 'Guinea' vs 'Guineas'

    Anybody could make mistakes when flustered under cross-examination in a court of law.

    . . .Or trying to remember his lines when being filmed in a TV drama.

    Rover
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 01-Mar-2012 at 22:47.

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    #5

    Re: 'Guinea' vs 'Guineas'

    @Rover_KE, thank you. So, '25 guinea' is a mistake then?

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