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    #1

    g/r

    Dear teachers,

    This is what is printed on an imported food package: 200 g/r. I thought it means 200 gram (=kilogramm) gross weight. But it is translted into Chinese as "net weight" 200 kilogrammes net weight.
    Could please kindly what this g/r means?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: g/r

    gr. just means gram(s)/grammes(s).

    g/r is a mistake.

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    #3

    Re: g/r

    Hi 5jj,

    Thank you very much for your reply. I found three expressions on food package. Those packages of food are imported from Germany.

    e200g/r; e200g and 200ge.

    If the first one is a mistake, could you please explain what "e" stands for?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: g/r

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Hi 5jj,

    Thank you very much for your reply. I found three expressions on food package. Those packages of food are imported from Germany.

    e200g/r; e200g and 200ge.

    If the first one is a mistake, could you please explain what "e" stands for?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    If the packages are imported from Germany, perhaps you need a German speaker to explain it.

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    #5

    Re: g/r

    As far as the first "e" symbol goes, here's the explanation: What's that little 'e' symbol? - The Dieline: The World's #1 Package Design Website -

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    #6

    Re: g/r

    What was the product? Some products have more than one weight- if, for example, you buy something that is in brine (salt + water), it is normal to give the total weight and the weight without the brine so you know how much of the product you're buying, so the translation of net weight may be correct- let's hope a German speaker reads this thread.

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    #7

    Re: g/r

    Dear Tdol,

    One product is "cereal" and the other is "bar of chocolate and oat". Now I see the problem. I thought the "e", "g" and "r" are English letters. But acturally they are German.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang

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    #8

    Re: g/r

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear Tdol,

    One product is "cereal" and the other is "bar of chocolate and oat". Now I see the problem. I thought the "e", "g" and "r" are English letters. But acturally they are German.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    The "e", "g" and "r" are not exclusively any language. The link I posted shows that the "e" is a European-wide symbol to show that there is a small allowance for variation in the weight of the product. The word "gram[me]" is also pretty much Europe-wide and now that we're all metric, almost everything in Europe will have the weight shown as a figure followed by "g", "gr" or it seems "g/r" perhaps. In the UK, we normally see the "e" symbol and then just "400g".

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    #9

    Re: g/r

    Hi emsr2d2, It seems there is something wrong with my computer I can 't wrap to the next line. So I have to type my reply this way. Sorry about that. Thank you very much for your help. To tell you the truth, It took me a long time and effort to understand the explanation in the website you gave me. By reading it and you explanation I think I understand it now. Jiang

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    #10

    Re: g/r

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    gr. just means gram(s)/grammes(s).

    g/r is a mistake.
    ...Perhaps it means 'grams per <something>'... It depends on what's in the bottle. Perhaps it's 'grams as a percentage of the RDA [Recommended Daily Amount]'. But I agree - it's probably a typo.

    (Incidentally jiang, '200 gram (=kilogramm)' is wrong. There are 1000 grams in a kilo.)

    b

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