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    #1

    try up

    We were told go through all possible meanings of the phrasal verb "to try up". I've been trying to look up its meaning but I haven't been able to find it in the dictionary. There are 7 sentences with "try up'' in them on COCAE. Here's one of them.

    " 1976 To betray a confidential source would mean to try up many future sources for many future reporters."

    OR

    "The visiting Vegas dancer wants beer. (Try up the road, just over the Maryland line.) A rail-thin woman buys four packs of crackers, two Go-Go Taquitos and a breakfast sandwich, then waits 20 minutes for the 2 a.m. delivery of fresh doughnuts."

    What are the meanings of the phrasal verb "to try up"?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: try up

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    We were told go through all possible meanings of the phrasal verb "to try up". I've been trying to look up its meaning but I haven't been able to find it in the dictionary. There are 7 sentences with "try up'' in them on COCAE. Here's one of them.

    " 1976 To betray a confidential source would mean to try up many future sources for many future reporters."

    OR

    "The visiting Vegas dancer wants beer. (Try up the road, just over the Maryland line.) A rail-thin woman buys four packs of crackers, two Go-Go Taquitos and a breakfast sandwich, then waits 20 minutes for the 2 a.m. delivery of fresh doughnuts."

    What are the meanings of the phrasal verb "to try up"?
    I've never heard of "try up". What does it mean?
    Your first sentence doesn't make sense to me.
    Your second example doesn't use it as a phrasal verb. The verb is "try". Where should I try? "Up the road", ie. "Try looking up the road."

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    #3

    Re: try up

    The first may be a mistake- I am not sure, but that may mean tie up or trip up.
    The second is not a phrasal verb; it is try (up the road).

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    #4

    Re: try up

    We were told by our teacher to learn the meaning of "to try up''. I've been unable to find it in the dictionary.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: try up

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    We were told by our teacher to learn the meaning of "to try up''. I've been unable to find it in the dictionary.
    You could probably safely tell your teacher that it doesn't many anything. Maybe s/he came across it somewhere and doesn't know what it means either?

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    #6

    Re: try up

    I would not know.

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    #7

    Re: try up

    I agree with everyone else. "To try up" is not a phrasal verb I have ever heard. In the second example, it's just "to try" followed by a statement of where the person should try [looking].

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    #8

    Re: try up

    The first one is probably a typo for "dry up."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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