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  1. mr_useless's Avatar
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    #1

    keeping (a/the/without an article) access clear

    I am confused with these sentenses:

    You must give an eye on/to keeping the access clear for other people.
    or: You must give an eye on/to keeping the clear access for other people.
    or: You must give an eye on/to keeping clear access of the workshop for other people.

    Which one of them is correct, which is not correct and why? please explain.

    Thank you.

  2. SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: keeping (a/the/without an article) access clear

    (Not a Teacher)

    "Give an eye to" isn't a phrase I'm familiar with. However, I have heard of "with an eye to":
    "You must setup a security perimeter with an eye to ensuring easy access for other people."

    You could also just say:
    "You must keep the workshop accessible to other people."

  3. mr_useless's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: keeping (a/the/without an article) access clear

    No!
    I hear people say "give an eye on" too.
    My question is that whether "give an eye on" or "give an eye to" can be used?
    Do we use an article immediately after "keeping", or use no article, or follow by a prepossition, or a noun?

    I am confused with these sentenses:

    You must give an eye on/to keeping the access clear for other people.
    or: You must give an eye on/to keeping the clear access for other people.
    or: You must give an eye on/to keeping clear access (of the workshop) for other people.
    or: You must give an eye on/to keeping access clear for other people
    Which one of them is correct, which is not correct and why? please explain.

    Thank you.

  4. Tullia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: keeping (a/the/without an article) access clear

    I would say that "give an eye on" is not a phrase in BrE. I did a google search and the first three pages of results yielded nothing on any reputable sites written by native speakers.


    We *do* say "keep an eye on" which means to be constantly aware of something, or to monitor something to check its status. Examples:
    "I'm just popping to the shops. Will you keep an eye on the kids for me?"
    "As a good manager, I keep an eye on all my staff and check they aren't browsing the internet when they should be working."
    "I must remember to keep an eye on how much milk we've got - I don't want to run out by Sunday when the shops will be closed."


    We also say "keep an eye out for" which means to be alert to the possibility of something.
    Examples:
    "I'm expecting a package that won't fit through the letterbox. Can you keep an eye out for the postman arriving?"
    "I must keep an eye out for the new Game of Thrones book - I really want to read it!"


    As SlickVic says, we also use "with an eye to". His example is correct for this. It means "with the aim of".


    There are many other idioms using "eye" or "eyes". If you have any questions about them I would be happy to help.


    With regard to your original sentence, I would suggest one of the following:
    You must keep an eye on making sure there is clear access for other people.
    You must pay attention to keeping clear access to the workshop for other people.

    If I was writing it, I would probably simplify it a little and say:
    You must keep access to the workshop clear for other people.


  5. mr_useless's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: keeping (a/the/without an article) access clear

    It must be "keep an eye on". I heard Australian say that which I thought "give an eye on". Thank you.

    You must keep an eye on making sure there is clear access for other people.
    You must pay attention to keeping clear access to the workshop for other people.


    I guess "clear" is used here as an adjective modifying "access". So, after regund we can use a noun without an article, so, I can say " You must pay attention to keeping access to the workshop for other people." Is this correct?

    What is the word "sure" being used here? Is it used as an adverb? Can I say "You must keep an eye on making there is clear access for other people."


    Thank you for your time and patient.

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