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    #1

    Red face a few interesting questions

    1) If A does something for B and in turn B want to thank A, I say "B will give you a treat to the restaurant."

    The 'to' sounds strange. Are there any ways we can change the preposition and retain the syntactic orginality as much as possible? That is, don't say it will be his treat...

    2) It seems all the and all of the are identical?
    All the shops are closed. All of the shops are closed.

    3) At a fast-food restaurant, which of the following are 'common', 'appropriate' and 'native-like [i.e. used by native English speakers?]'
    - Stay here?
    - to go?
    - take away?
    - dine here?
    Anymore?

    4) when 'though' is at the end of a sentence, it, really, simply means 'but' placing at the end of a sentence. However, we do hear native speakers say

    But XXXXXX though

    This double marking may not be grammatically correct but is that very common?


    Thanks so much!

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    #2

    Re: a few interesting questions

    1) If A does something for B and in turn B want to thank A, say "B would like to treat you to a meal at a restaurant."


    2) It seems all the and all of the are identical? Yes, they mean the same.
    All the shops are closed. All of the shops are closed.

    3) At a fast-food restaurant, which of the following are 'common', 'appropriate' and 'native-like [i.e. used by native English speakers?]'
    - Stay here?
    - to go?
    - take away?
    - dine here?
    Eat in or take out?


    4) when 'though' is at the end of a sentence, it, really, simply means 'but' placing at the end of a sentence. However, we do hear native speakers say

    I don't understand your question. Context is important.

    Can I borrow Mary's blouse tomorrow?
    Maybe. Be sure to ask permission, though.

    It can mean "however."


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    #3

    Re: a few interesting questions

    Is this for here or to go?

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    #4

    Re: a few interesting questions

    for (3), I can say:
    - Stay here?
    - to go?
    - take away?
    - dine here?
    for here or to go?
    eat in or take out?


    Right?


    4) Yeah, e.g.


    I like to go out, but it's raining though [I heard a native English speaker say this the other day]
    I was wondering if but + though [seemingly redundant] is common despite of its ungrammaticality.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a few interesting questions

    Eat in or take away?

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    #6

    Re: a few interesting questions

    In the US, it's "carry out".

    me: you wanna eat in?
    my wife: yes, but let's get carry out.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: a few interesting questions

    Also in the US, it's "take out" or "to go."
    Is this for here to to go?
    Let's get take-out Chinese for dinner tonight.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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