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    #1

    Two in seven

    Hello,


    Is there any difference in meaning between these two expressions?:

    Two in ten

    Two out of ten

    I can't give you any context.

    Thank you

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Two in seven

    Why can't you give us any context? You must have seen those combinations of words somewhere. You didn't just pluck them out of thin air!

  2. Calis's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Two in seven

    Quote Originally Posted by ratóncolorao View Post
    Hello,


    Is there any difference in meaning between these two expressions?:

    Two in ten

    Two out of ten

    I can't give you any context.

    Thank you
    There is a slight distinction. Both can mean the same thing, but if you say "two in ten", that would mean more "two people in every ten that was asked out of n people" but "two out of ten" would mean more "two people out of the ten in total that I asked". They can, as I said above, mean the same thing but it's a good idea to stick to those definitions.

    However, to echo emsr2d2, it would help if you gave us some context; the inferences I've given are purely from those words on their own, the context may give a slightly different meaning.

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    #4

    Re: Two in seven

    if you say "two in ten", that would mean more "two people in every ten that was asked out of
    n people" but "two out of ten" would mean more "two people out of the ten in total that I asked".
    I don't agree. The phrases are equivalent.

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