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    #1

    as seen

    Hi,

    -As seen from CNN's coverage, he was suffered terribly from his illness. (Does it mean 'as he is seen or as it is seen?)
    -As known, he is a waiter. (Does it mean 'as it is known or as he is known?)

    -As is known, he is a waiter.
    -As it is known, he is a waiter.

    Must the subjects used in both clauses be the same?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: as seen

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    Hi,

    -As seen from CNN's coverage, he has suffered terribly from his illness. (Does it mean 'as he is seen or as it is seen?)
    It means, "As you can see from the CNN coverage ... " It doesn't mean 'he' is known from the coverage.

    -As known, he is a waiter. (Does it mean 'as it is known or as he is known?)
    "As we all know, he is a waiter." We don't know him; we know that he is a waiter. (We might know him, but that's not what the sentence says).

    -As is known, he is a waiter.
    -As it is known, he is a waiter.

    Must the subjects used in both clauses be the same?
    No, "it" is the subject (often implied) of the first clause, and "he" is the subject of the second clause in the above.
    Last edited by Raymott; 17-Mar-2012 at 20:01.

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    #3

    Re: as seen

    Thanks for the answer. What I have understood is:

    -Because asked by another person earlier, I don't want to give an answer to this question.
    -Because of being asked by another person earlier, I don't want to give an answer to this question.

    I means 'because this question was asked by another person earlier, I don't want to give an answer to this question', is that right?

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    #4

    Re: as seen

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    Thanks for the answer. What I have understood is:

    -Because asked by another person earlier, I don't want to give an answer to this question.
    -Because of being asked by another person earlier, I don't want to give an answer to this question.
    "Having been asked this question previously, I don’t want to answer it again."

    It means 'because this question was asked by another person earlier, I don't want to give an answer to this question', is that right?
    Yes, that’s right. But it would more likely be expressed as I have in blue.
    But I can’t see how you could understand this from my reply. Is it related?

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    #5

    Re: as seen

    I have asked because I have seen that the subjects used in both sentences must be the same if we shorten the sentence using passive voice. For example:

    -Because asked by another person earlier, I don't want to give an answer to this question.

    The subject in the main clause is ''this question'', but the subject in the second clause is '' I '', is that right?

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    #6

    Re: as seen

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    I have asked because I have seen that the subjects used in both sentences must be the same if we shorten the sentence using passive voice. For example:

    -Because asked by another person earlier, I don't want to give an answer to this question.

    The subject in the main clause is ''this question'', but the subject in the second clause is '' I '', is that right?
    No, the second clause is the main clause; it has the subject "I".
    The "because" clause is the dependent clause, with the implied subject "I".
    Your sentence is strange, as I've said. But not many people would read it as "Because the question was asked ...". It means "Because I was asked ...."
    If you really have to use this construction, you'd have to write, "Because it was asked earlier ..." to mean "the question".

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    #7

    Re: as seen

    Thanks for the answer. May I ask one more question? Can we combine the participle 'having + V3' with the prepositions such as 'because of, when, after,...etc?

    Because of having been invited to the cinema, she felt unhappy.

    After having watched TV, I went out.

    When having ..........

    Although having.........

    Thanks...

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    #8

    Re: as seen

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    Thanks for the answer. May I ask one more question? Can we combine the participle 'having + V3' with the prepositions such as 'because of, when, after,...etc?

    Because of having been invited to the cinema, she felt unhappy. This is grammatical but it's unlikely IMO.

    After having watched TV, I went out. This is fine.

    When having ..........

    Although having.........

    Thanks...
    Bhai.

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    #9

    Re: as seen

    Is the preposition 'when' included in this form, is that right? Can we use 'when' with 'having + V3'? Because I have just read that we can't use 'when' in that way, but I don't know whether that is correct or not.

    When having + V3, (dependent clause)

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    #10

    Re: as seen

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    Is the preposition 'when' included in this form, is that right? Can we use 'when' with 'having + V3'? Because I have just read that we can't use 'when' in that way, but I don't know whether that is correct or not.

    When having + V3, (dependent clause)
    The advice that's it's wrong is correct.

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