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  1. 1364's Avatar
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    #1

    Question <Language Quizzes >

    Hi my dear master;

    While I was searching”<Language Quizzes > Journey, Travel & Trip” in this site I saw this question:
    Q2 - My ____ to work takes an hour.
    journey
    travel
    trip

    would you please Choose the correct answer .

    thanks in advance

  2. #2

    Re: <Language Quizzes >

    Quote Originally Posted by 1364
    Hi my dear master;

    While I was searching”<Language Quizzes > Journey, Travel & Trip” in this site I saw this question:
    Q2 - My ____ to work takes an hour.
    journey
    travel
    trip

    would you please Choose the correct answer .

    thanks in advance

    I would say trip.


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    #3

    Re: <Language Quizzes >

    Hmm, interesting- I'd use journey. Is this a differencein usage? In BrE, when we focus on the travelling alone, we use journey. The quiz might have to be altered.

  3. 1364's Avatar
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    #4

    Wink Re: <Language Quizzes >

    Quote Originally Posted by Marylin
    I would say trip.

    Hi;
    Yes the same as me ,I choose “trip”. but they consider "journey" as the best answer.so I was in doubt whether the result was right or not? but according to difference between these words: "journey"-(long trip), "trip" - a visit to a place for a short time
    (so we can’t use "journey" for the distance between home & work) anyway
    Thanks for your reply.

    Kindest regards

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: <Language Quizzes >

    Duration seems to be the difference here.

    "journey", from French "jour" (day), "A day's travel", and later, "daily travel (to work)", whereas "trip", from Old German, meaning to tread or step lightly, hop, skip.

    EX: A journey to the moon. (a longer travel duration-time to the goal)
    EX: A trip to the moon. (a shorter travel duration-time to the goal)

    In North America, both "trip" and "journey" can be a day, days, months, but "journey" sounds awkward if it's an hour, even minutes, whereas "trip" doesn't; e.g., I took a five-minute trip to the store this morning. A "trip" is quick, direct, just like a step, a hop, a skip.

    From etymonline.com:

    c.1225, "a defined course of traveling," from O.Fr. journée "day's work or travel," from V.L. diurnum "day," noun use of neut. of L. diurnus "of one day" (see diurnal). As recently as Johnson (1755) the primary sense was still "the travel of a day." The verb is from c.1330. Journeyman (1424), "one who works by day," preserves the etymological sense.

  5. 1364's Avatar
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    #6

    Wink Re: <Language Quizzes >

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Duration seems to be the difference here.

    "journey", from French "jour" (day), "A day's travel", and later, "daily travel (to work)", whereas "trip", from Old German, meaning to tread or step lightly, hop, skip.

    EX: A journey to the moon. (a longer travel duration-time to the goal)
    EX: A trip to the moon. (a shorter travel duration-time to the goal)

    In North America, both "trip" and "journey" can be a day, days, months, but "journey" sounds awkward if it's an hour, even minutes, whereas "trip" doesn't; e.g., I took a five-minute trip to the store this morning. A "trip" is quick, direct, just like a step, a hop, a skip.

    From etymonline.com:

    c.1225, "a defined course of traveling," from O.Fr. journée "day's work or travel," from V.L. diurnum "day," noun use of neut. of L. diurnus "of one day" (see diurnal). As recently as Johnson (1755) the primary sense was still "the travel of a day." The verb is from c.1330. Journeyman (1424), "one who works by day," preserves the etymological sense.
    thanks for your reply dear cas;it was very useful

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    #7

    Re: <Language Quizzes >

    OK, it's a difference I didn't know- in BrE trip = journey + purpose.

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