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    #1

    have got/got

    I have got a problem.

    In informal or spoken Enlish, can we leave out the "have" i.e. "I got a problem"?

    Thanks.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: have got/got

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    I have got a problem.

    In informal or spoken English, can we leave out the "have" i.e. "I got a problem"?

    Thanks.
    I wouldn't.

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    #3

    Re: have got/got

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I wouldn't.
    Hi bhaisahab,

    Many thanks.

    Would Americans say like this?
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 27-Mar-2012 at 10:18.

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    #4

    Re: have got/got

    Yes, you'll hear "I got a problem" in spoken AmE.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: have got/got

    But it sounds horrible to me. Unless I'm singing "I Got Rhythm." And then I still probably try to slip in the 've sound.

    On the other hand "You gotta problem wid dat?" is pretty standard when you want to immitate a gangster.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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