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    #1

    Synthesis

    Mr Sloan bought a house for her wife. She is a neurosurgeon.

    The answer given is: Mr Sloan's wife, whom he bought a house for, is a neurosurgeon. I don't think the answer is correct.

    My suggestions are as follows:

    Mrs Sloan, whom her husband bought a house for, is a neurosurgeon. or

    Mrs Sloan, for whom her husband bought a house, is a neurosurgeon.

    Am I on the correct track?

    Thanks.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Synthesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    Mr Sloan bought a house for his wife. She is a neurosurgeon.

    The answer given is: Mr Sloan's wife, whom he bought a house for, is a neurosurgeon. I don't think the answer is correct.

    My suggestions are as follows:

    Mrs Sloan, whom her husband bought a house for, is a neurosurgeon. or

    Mrs Sloan, for whom her husband bought a house, is a neurosurgeon.

    Am I on the correct track?

    Thanks.
    Assuming the first line should read 'his' not 'her', I agree.
    In the suggested correct answer, it is not stated that the house was bought by Mr Sloan.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Synthesis

    If Mr Sloan's wife is a neurosurgeon, she is Dr. Sloan.

    And NONE of those answers are ever likely to be spoken. Aside from his buying a house for her (won't they live in it together?) constructions like "for whom her husband bought a house" are extremely unlikely in this type of sentence.

    What's wrong with "Mr. Sloan bough a house for his wife, who is a neurosurgeon"? Or, if you must use these awkward phrasing styles, Dr. Sloan, whose husband bought a house for her, is a neurosurgeon"?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: Synthesis

    Thanks, Raymott. You are right. Mr Sloan bought a house for his wife. She is a neurosurgeon. I have a habit of mixing up the sex of a person when writing and talking. Guess I am getting old.

    Thanks, Barb. I forgot to mention that the question requires whom within the sentence. Thanks also for your suggestions.

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