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    #1

    neither

    Hi,

    I have no choice,
    me neither or me too.

    I think the answer is me neither, because 'no choice' means 'not any choice' , is that right?

    Thanks...

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: neither

    Yes

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: neither

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    Hi,

    I have no choice,
    me neither or me too.

    I think the answer is me neither, because 'no choice' means 'not any choice' , is that right?

    Thanks...
    Correct.

    Negative statement, and you agree:
    I don't either.
    Me neither.
    Neither do I.

    Positive statement, and you agree:
    Me too.
    I do too.
    (Some people put commas before "too.)

    EDIT: Dang -- I was too slow!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: neither

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Dang -- I was too slow!
    That's because you gave more helpful information than I did.

  4. moonlike's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: neither

    I have also seen "me either" for negative statements.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: neither

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlike View Post
    I have also seen "me either" for negative statements.
    That's incorrect.

  6. moonlike's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: neither

    Dear bhaisahab,
    You mean even in novels or conversation? Because I found it in a novel.
    Tahnks

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: neither

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlike View Post
    Dear bhaisahab,
    You mean even in novels or conversation? Because I found it in a novel.
    Tahnks
    You will hear it, but you will hear a lot of things said that are incorrect/non-standard/uneducated English.

  8. moonlike's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: neither

    Thanks.

  9. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: neither

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlike View Post
    Dear bhaisahab,
    You mean even in novels or conversation? Because I found it in a novel.
    Tahnks
    If you saw "me either" in a novel, it would have to be dialogue (unless it was a first person novel). Either way, that is representative of how the character speaks. The author is not asserting that it is correct English.
    If you read narrative or description in a novel, you can generally trust that to be good English. Generally - because the novel is often an experimental form.

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