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    #1

    Word "manner"

    I am wondering if these sentences are correct?

    1. Nobody liked his condescending and arrogant manner.
    2. The discussion ended in a civilized manner.
    3. She had perfect manners she had inherited from her parents.
    4. Nobody could understand that such a well-mannered man could become such a criminal.
    4. She felt that something has changed in the manner her husband had been treating her.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Word "manner"

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post
    I am wondering if these sentences are correct?

    1. Nobody liked his condescending and arrogant manner. Yes.

    2. The discussion ended in a civilized manner. Yes, although I think something "ending" in any manner is a little odd. A discussion would normally take place in a civilized manner but it would simply end.

    3. She had perfect manners [which] she [had] inherited from her parents. Yes, although you could use the past simple in the second half of the sentence, to match the simple past in the first, and I might add "which" as shown.

    4. Nobody could understand thathow such a well-mannered man could become such a criminal. In this context, I prefer "understand how". An alternative would be "believe that".

    4. She felt that something had changed in the manner in which her husband had been treating her.
    The use of "manner" is fine in all of them but I have made a few comments/amendments above.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Word "manner"

    I would argue that you don't inherit manners from your parents, though you can have manners instilled in you by your parents. There is nothing genetic about using a fork to eat instead of shoving food in your mouth with your hands.

    You realize that that manners = behaviors that display courtesy and rituals expected in polite society and manner = way/method are not the same word, right?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    Student or Learner
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    #4

    Re: Word "manner"

    Both valid?

    Please learn how to behave.
    Please learn manners. <-------- doesn't sound good

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    #5

    Re: Word "manner"

    Quote Originally Posted by virus99 View Post
    Please learn manners. <-------- doesn't sound good
    I'd be more likely to say to my children/pupils: "Where are your manners?". or simply "Manners!"

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Word "manner"

    Quote Originally Posted by virus99 View Post
    Both valid?

    Please learn manners. <-------- doesn't sound good
    You're right. It doesn't sound good. However, "Please learn some manners" was one of my grandfather's favourite utterances. I can't really explain why the addition of "some" makes it more natural, or perhaps I only think it's natural because I heard it so many times when I was a child.

    We use "Manners!" (as 5jj said), "Mind your manners" or "Where are your manners?" though.

    EDIT: I really wasn't copying 5jj's post!
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 06-Apr-2012 at 15:41. Reason: Not copying!

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    #7

    Re: Word "manner"

    [QUOTE=emsr2d2;872601 I really wasn't copying 5jj's post![/QUOTE]hmmm

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