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    #1

    The preposition 'bar'

    Hi,

    I am learning the use of prepositions, but I'm a bit stuck with one of them. It's 'bar'. I would like to know if it's correct to say for example:

    I go to scholl bar my glasses.

    I don't meet often this preposition in the newspapers, is it commonly used?

    Thank in advance for your replies.

    Have a nice day.

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    #2

    Re: The preposition 'bar'

    NOT A TEACHER.

    "Bar" is not often used as a preposition, at least in my experience.

    I don't think your sentence is correct, but I may be wrong. It would be much more natural to say, "I go to school without my glasses."

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The preposition 'bar'

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen165 View Post
    NOT A TEACHER.

    "Bar" is not often used as a preposition, at least in my experience.

    I don't think your sentence is correct, but I may be wrong. It would be much more natural to say, "I go to school without my glasses."
    'Bar' is not a preposition when correctly used. Some people - especially sports commentators, use it to mean 'except for'; racing book-makers use it as an abbreviation meaning 'and loads more that we can't be bothered with': 'Lucky Lady 2-1, Long John Silver 4-1, Boat Race 10-1, 100-1 bar' [meaning 'there are lower prices for several other horses]. A more common usage, away from racecourses, is 'S/he is the best or any other superlative] bar none [= 'without exception'].

    In some dialects (Yorkshire springs to mind) a word conventionally written as 'baht is used in place of 'without'. A song widely known even outside Yorkshire is called 'On Ilkley more 'baht 'at' [that is, 'without a hat]; but outside Yorkshire - where the meaning is not known - this is often rendered as 'On Ilkey Moor bar tat'. Nobody has any idea what a 'tat' might be; and the force of 'baht 'at is made relevant by the second verse, which starts 'Then tha shalt catch thy death o' cold'. So this 'baht is a preposition. Which might explain where the OP got the idea that 'bar' was one.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 08-Apr-2012 at 12:34. Reason: typos

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The preposition 'bar'

    I have to disagree with Bob here. 'Bar' can function as a preposition It has the meaning of 'except for' rather than just 'without'.

    The whole class bar two signed the card.
    She is the best bar none.
    It's all over bar the shouting.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: The preposition 'bar'

    No you don't, I do. . In fact I used the words 'except for' and 'bar none' in my post). But as you all know by now, the naming of parts isn't my strong suit. Homer nodded, but frantically (almost broke his neck, in a head movement that - appropriately enough - could be described as epic in scale! )

    b

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