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    #1

    What does this phrase mean?

    Hi, teachers:
    I'm not sure if this is an idiom so I don't choose the idiom prefix.

    I was watching a British TV show Yes Minister. And Jim Hacker (the Minister of Administration)said to his constituency:

    "We have doffed our hats, bowed our knees, and turned our forelocks.....But enough is enough."

    Judging from the context, I assume "turned our forelocks"'s meaning is close to "bowed our knees" (give in), isn't it?

    But since this phrase is not shown in the subtitle I'm not even sure if I typed it right. And I googled but failed to find such an idiom in any dictionary.

    Would love to hear your explanation. Many thanks:)


    Hugo.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: What does this phrase mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo_Lin View Post
    Hi, teachers:
    I'm not sure if this is an idiom so I don't choose the idiom prefix.

    I was watching a British TV show Yes Minister. And Jim Hacker (the Minister of Administration)said to his constituency:

    "We have doffed our hats, bowed our knees, and turned our forelocks.....But enough is enough."

    Judging from the context, I assume "turned our forelocks"'s meaning is close to "bowed our knees" (give in), isn't it?

    But since this phrase is not shown in the subtitle I'm not even sure if I typed it right. And I googled but failed to find such an idiom in any dictionary.

    Would love to hear your explanation. Many thanks:)


    Hugo.
    The phrase is "touched our forelocks". We "touch our forelock" as a sign of subservience when we don't have a hat to "doff". Both of these expressions are outdated. To understand "forelock" and "doff", have a look at these links: forelock noun - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online doff verb - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 08-Apr-2012 at 18:20.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: What does this phrase mean?

    I have always used "tug" with "forelock", though I can see from various dictionaries that both "tug" and "touch" are acceptable.

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