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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    Aye

    Is "Aye" only for meeting consent or a general use?

    go1-ybm-3
    CP: It has been moved and seconded that we create a site to deal with verbal and physical abuse. All in favor?
    Everyone: Aye.
    CP: Opposed?

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    #2

    Re: Aye

    It's used in parliament in the UK for voting, so it has that association. It can be used in some regional forms, so if someone offered you a coffee, you could use it, but it's not that common.

  2. Tullia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Aye

    You might also come across it in the phrase "Aye-aye cap'n" which basically means "Yes captain" in a nautical sense. If you heard that on dry land, it would probably be being used ironically in some fashion, or with jocular intent.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Aye

    But not just that. 'Aye-Aye' means 'I've heard the command and will do it.' On a ship you could get this exchange.

    Captain: 'It's a rough night, isn't it.'
    Subordinate: 'Aye, it is, cap'n.'
    Captain: 'Splice the mainbrace.'
    [No idea what this means, but it's traditional - and for the purposes of this example the meaning doesn't matter. What matters is that it's a command. ]
    Subordinate: 'Aye-aye, cap'n.'

    b

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Aye

    In our Parliament, modelled on yours, we use "Yea" and "Nay." I didn't know yours used "Aye."

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    It's used in parliament in the UK for voting, so it has that association. It can be used in some regional forms, so if someone offered you a coffee, you could use it, but it's not that common.

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    #6

    Re: Aye

    It's not used in daily life in AmE. Only when voice voting.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Aye

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    In our Parliament, modelled on yours, we use "Yea" and "Nay." I didn't know yours used "Aye."
    Made me think for a while - but Tdol's right. This exchange is frequent in the House of Commons:

    Speaker: All those in favour say 'Aye'.
    One side: Aye.
    Spkr: To the contrary, 'Nay'.
    Other side: Nay.
    Spkr: I think the 'Ayes' have it./or Clear the lobbies. [The first stage in the physical voting procedure.]

    b

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  1. Correct use of "aye"? (Scottish)
    By meerkat30 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 17-Aug-2010, 11:06

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