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    #1

    Jock in British English

    Dear Teachers

    In the US, people use the word "jock" to describe an illiterate person whose life only revolve around sports. How about in UK, do British use the same word, or they have their own word for "jock"?

    Regards

    Anthony

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    #2

    Re: Jock in British English

    I can't think of one.

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    #3

    Re: Jock in British English

    Quote Originally Posted by patran View Post

    In the US, people use the word "jock" to describe an illiterate person whose life only revolve around sports. How about in UK, do British use the same word, or they have their own word for "jock"?


    Our American friends will comment on the first statement when they wake up later. I'm not sure it's true that a jock is always considered illiterate.

    We don't use jock in the UK, but we might describe him as a sporty person or sport mad.

    Rover

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Jock in British English

    I am pretty certain our American counterparts will have something to say about the "illiterate" suggestion. It's true that in many films, the "jocks" are shown as being very good at sport but not so gifted academically, but they are far from illiterate.

    I can't think of any BrE equivalent - we don't consider sport to be as important at high school as they do in America. For most secondary school students in the UK, sport is something they are forced to do at school for a couple of hours a week and most of them hate it. Most schools do have a soccer team and a netball team but there's rarely much competition to get into the team.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Jock in British English

    My forum friends are correct. While a jock may value sports more than academics, there is NO implication he is stupid, illiterate, or academically failing.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Jock in British English

    Now the pendulum has swung all the way over in the other direction. I agree the term applies to someone who excels in sports, and values sports (esp. Am. Football) above all else; and I agree the notion of illiteracy is not part of the concept; but I think there is a stereotype in the US that the jock is the opposite of the geek, who IS very smart (it's a good thing high school is not so orthodox everywhere! poor kids!)
    Last edited by konungursvia; 15-Apr-2012 at 15:49.

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    #7

    Re: Jock in British English

    English people sometimes use the word 'Jock' to refer to Scottish people. Being Scottish I take slight offence to this slur but my English friends tell me there are no negative implications....

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Jock in British English

    Quote Originally Posted by richardavie View Post
    English people sometimes use the word 'Jock' to refer to Scottish people. Being Scottish I take slight offence to this slur but my English friends tell me there are no negative implications....
    I don't use it but I can confirm that I don't believe that it is intended to have negative implications. I hear it the same way that Australians refer to us as "Poms". Now, when they call us "whingeing Poms" that's another matter!

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Jock in British English

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    ...
    ...we might describe him as a sporty person or sport mad.

    Rover
    Bot occasionally I've heard a phrase that refers to a particular sport - 'rugger b*gger'. Also, given the popularity of TV shows like Glee and fils like 10 things I hate about you I wouldn't be surprised if very young speakers of British English are beginning to use 'jock' in the American sense. Most aspects of American youth are on the way. In my childhood we didn't go Trick or Treating or have a School Prom; and my sisters didn't ask their mother to fork out for a Prom Dress.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 15-Apr-2012 at 19:26.

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    #10

    Re: Jock in British English

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I don't use it but I can confirm that I don't believe that it is intended to have negative implications. I hear it the same way that Australians refer to us as "Poms". Now, when they call us "whingeing Poms" that's another matter!
    Thanks! I guess it all depends how and in what context you say it

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