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    #1

    Cool There... there?

    I have heard somewhere that 2 'there's' are possible in a sentence and they serve different functions?

    E.g.

    There is a cat there.

    What are the different functions? thanks

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: There... there?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tedwonny View Post
    I have heard somewhere that 2 'there's' are possible in a sentence and they serve different functions?

    E.g.

    There is a cat there.

    What are the different functions? thanks
    What do you think the functions are in your example sentence?

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    #3

    Re: There... there?

    the first 'there' is called the existential there. The second there seems to refer to location?

    I'm a bit iffy...

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: There... there?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tedwonny View Post
    the first 'there' is called the existential there. The second there seems to refer to location?

    I'm a bit iffy*...
    You needn't be. That's quite right.

    Existential => it exists
    Locative => there, as distinct from anywhere else

    b

    PS *But a person isn't 'iffy'; something that's dubious is. The trouble is 'dubious' works both ways - you can be dubious about a dubious proposition; but you can't be iffy about an iffy one!

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    #5

    Re: There... there?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Tedwonny:

    I thought that this famous sentence by the poet Gertrude Stein would amuse you:

    There is no there there.

    We understand the first there and the third there, but what about the second there?

    If you google this famous sentence, you will find many explanations. One of them goes like this:

    She returned to her hometown after many years' absence and discovered that her house, school, park, etc., no

    longer existed there. So she wrote: There is no there there.

    What part of speech is the second there? (I do not have the confidence to tell you my guess.)

    Hopefully, a teacher will answer us.


    HAVE A NICE DAY!

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: There... there?

    It's a sort of pro-pronoun; instead of standing in for a noun it stands in for a metaphor. (Leastways, that's how I see it.)

    b

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    #7

    Re: There... there?

    I actually use that epxression quite a bit. For example, when someone has sent me something to edit, and I'm unable to find any subtance to what's been written. It's just a lot of gobbledy-gook or fluffy or pumped up writing. "What do you really want to say? Because in what you sent me, there's no there there."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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