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  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #21

    Re: British or Britisher

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    I am not a good reader, but I do not think that any British person answered this question from two fellow members:

    Is it OK to refer to people as "Britons"?

    I also have another serious question. Would the "average" British person get angry if someone referred (in a friendly way) to

    him/her as a "L _ _ _ _"? (I am referring to that fruit that was used in the British Navy for nutritional purposes.)

    Of course, I know better than to ever visit Wales or Scotland and say something like "I like you English people"!
    I think it was only Americans who called us "limeys". It's extremely dated and I don't think many young English people would have ever heard it.
    As for "Britons", I don't object to it.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #22

    Re: British or Britisher

    I don't think anybody objects to 'Briton(s)'; it's jist that the word is rarely used apart from in news reports. especially headlines.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #23

    Re: British or Britisher

    I just asked my 17 year old daughter about "Limey", she said "I've never heard it. What does it mean?"

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #24

    Re: British or Britisher

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I just asked my 17 year old daughter about "Limey", she said "I've never heard it. What does it mean?"
    Blimey! She needs to know her nautical history! :)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #25

    Re: British or Britisher

    What a coincidence! (or is it?!)

    I have just opened the latest issue of Time magazine, and on page 13 is a photograph with these words:


    "Royal-wedding fever may have passed, but many Britons -- including this crowd at Leicester station -- still can't

    get enough of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge." [My boldfaced emphasis]

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #26

    Re: British or Britisher

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    "Royal-wedding fever may have passed, but many Britons -- including this crowd at Leicester station -- still can't get enough of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge."
    Almost certainly written by an American (i.e., not a British person).

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #27

    Re: British or Britisher

    Quote Originally Posted by Tullia View Post
    I didn't know, as Tdol mentioned, it is also used in SE Asia
    I haven't heard it used in SE Asia, but have heard it used by various South Asian Speakers.

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #28

    Re: British or Britisher

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    I am not a good reader, but I do not think that any British person answered this question* from two fellow members:

    Is it OK to refer to people as "Britons"?

    I also have another serious question. Would the "average" British person get angry if someone referred (in a friendly way) to

    him/her as a "L _ _ _ _"? (I am referring to that fruit that was used in the British Navy for nutritional purposes.)

    Of course, I know better than to ever visit Wales or Scotland and say something like "I like you English people"!
    *I think they did. Someone said it was best not to use it. (I didn't agree, but let it ride! I think context makes the Celtic ambiguity perfectly clear: in 'When Christian missionaries arrived in England at the end of the fifth century, the Britons were....' it obviously has that historico-ethnological meaning. But I am quite happy to be called a Briton (and manage to avoid reaching for the woad when I am. )

    And I'm not bothered about being called a Limey (and I don't feel we need be prissy about the spelling; it's just not offensive - but thanks for considering that possibility that we might refer to it as 'the L-word'!) TP probably knows, but this etymological link
    may interest some people.

    b

  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #29

    Re: British or Britisher

    I'm a Brit. I have no problem with being called "a Brit", "British" or a "limey". I really don't care. Quite honestly, if the person means to be offensive, then they'll probably sound/seem offensive no matter what they say.

    I have to admit that I've never really considered, when I've used "Yank", whether or not it might be construed as offensive. Having said that, I probably wouldn't say to someone's face "So you're a Yank?", I'd say "So you're American?". To a third party, non-American, I would probably then say "I met a Yank last night. Lovely bloke" etc. Maybe my non-use of it directly to an American person means that I am subconsciously aware of some potential offence. I really don't know.

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    #30

    Re: British or Britisher

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    if the person means to be offensive, then they'll probably sound offensive no matter what they say.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Exactly


    "Oh, you're English, are you!"

    Those words could be pronounced in different ways to mean either "I am so delighted to meet an English person" or "Do you think that

    you're better than anyone else just because you're English?!"

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