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    #1

    Aritcle

    Which is correct?
    He is a Christian.
    He is Christian

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Aritcle

    You can use both. In the first "Christian" is a noun, in the second, it's an adjective.

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    #3

    Re: Aritcle

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    You can use both. In the first "Christian" is a noun, in the second, it's an adjective.
    Thanks.
    Can these be used interchangeably or are used in different contexts?
    Please clarify.

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    #4

    Re: Aritcle

    The overall meaning is the same. Maybe you could suggest some contexts in which you're not sure which one to use and we could tell you whether one might sound more natural over the other.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Aritcle

    In your sentence, they are interchangeable. In "A Christian is a person who believes in Jesus Christ", only the noun is possible - though we could say "Christian (adjective) people / Christians (noun) / believe in Jesus Christ"

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    #6

    Re: Aritcle

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    The overall meaning is the same. Maybe you could suggest some contexts in which you're not sure which one to use and we could tell you whether one might sound more natural over the other.
    For example : At a all religion meeting, if I have to introduce one of the members who is a Christian then what will I say? "Meet Mr. Coutinho, he's Christian or he's a Christian?"
    or "Hello, I'm Harish Kumar,I'm Hindu or I'm a Hindu?"

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    #7

    Re: Aritcle

    They're both fine.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Aritcle

    (Nit picky comment: They're both fine if you write them with a full stop between the two sentences instead of a comma. No one can hear the punctuation when you speak, but in writing, you created a comma splice.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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  1. Definate Aritcle usage
    By Martin Benny in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Jun-2006, 03:47

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