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    #1

    uncountable

    The general rule is that we should use singular verb with uncountable nouns but there may be some exceptions to this rule I don't know.
    Would you please give me a guide? I would be grateful.
    Thanks,
    ata

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    #2

    Re: uncountable

    There are none that I know of.

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    #3

    Re: uncountable

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    There are none that I know of.
    Can I say police as a collective plural noun could be considered as an uncountable noun? Because we use plural form of the verb after it.

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    #4

    Re: uncountable

    No. 'Police' functions as a plural noun.

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    #5

    Re: uncountable

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    No. 'Police' functions as a plural noun.
    Nouns are divided to countable and uncountable nouns. If someone ask if it is countable or uncountable what can we say?

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    #6

    Re: uncountable

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    Nouns are divided to countable and uncountable nouns. If someone ask if it is countable or uncountable what can we say?
    There is no strict division. It is rather than some nouns, such as 'water', are normally used in an uncountable sense, others, such as 'man' are generally used in a countable sense. You have to judge each case by the context in which it appears. If it appears with an indefinite article in front of it, or it is used as a plural, then it is being used countably.
    Last edited by 5jj; 22-Apr-2012 at 06:39. Reason: typo

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    #7

    Re: uncountable

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    No. 'Police' functions as a plural noun.
    Does "Staff" function as a plural noun too?
    Example: The jail staff were helpless in preventing the inmates from escaping at the time of jailbreak as they were outnumbered by them.

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    #8

    Re: uncountable

    Speakers of AmE tend to use 'group' or 'collective' nouns as singular. In BrE, we can treat them as singulal or plural in meaning. In neither variety of English are they normally regarded as uncountable.

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    #9

    Re: uncountable

    So we'd better divide nouns into three groups: countable, uncountable, and collective nouns. Agree?

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    #10

    Re: uncountable

    No. Most collective nouns are countable: team/teams, committee/committees, etc. It just happens that in British English we often consider the members of the group, rather than the group itself, as the subject of the verb. This does not happen in American English.

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