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    • Join Date: Nov 2005
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    #1

    Red face comparative

    Hi. I'm in trouble. Please help me.

    The board can be bent 90 degrres in the X direction.
    The board can be bent 30 degrees in the Y direction.

    I want to transform the above two sentenses into one sentense using a comparative form.

    "The board can be bent in the X direction greater than in the Y direction. "
    Is this sentence grammatically correct?

  1. Vlad_the_Inhaler's Avatar

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
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    #2

    Re: comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by manky
    Hi. I'm in trouble. Please help me.

    The board can be bent 90 degrres in the X direction.
    The board can be bent 30 degrees in the Y direction.

    I want to transform the above two sentenses into one sentense using a comparative form.

    "The board can be bent in the X direction greater than in the Y direction. "
    Is this sentence grammatically correct?
    It is grammatically correct, but both more and further are better than greater. Greater = bigger, and we cannot say the board can be bent bigger.


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    #3

    Re: comparative

    Thank you for your quick reply!
    I have another question.

    "The board can be further bent in the X direction than in the Y direction. "

    Is this sentence is grammatically correct?
    I changed the position of adverb.

  2. Vlad_the_Inhaler's Avatar

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
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    #4

    Re: comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by manky
    Thank you for your quick reply!
    I have another question.

    "The board can be further bent in the X direction than in the Y direction. "

    Is this sentence is grammatically correct?
    I changed the position of adverb.
    Another quick answer - no, that is not good :) It is not that it breaks a grammatical rule (or if it does, it is not one of the rules I have in my head), it is just that it is so rare for such an adverb to precede the verb that it sounds strange. The adverb often precedes the verb, 'your money would be better spent on clothes than on alcohol', but in the above example it is not a good idea.
    Last edited by Vlad_the_Inhaler; 04-Dec-2005 at 19:42.


    • Join Date: Nov 2005
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    #5

    Re: comparative

    Your explanation is very clear!
    Thank you so much

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