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  1. huacunli's Avatar
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    #1

    Question re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    hello,
    The two phrases "go home" and "go on home" in the title above should mean the same I suppose, but I'm not sure about
    that. please make it clear for me, thank you

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    #2

    Re: re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    Yes, the meaning is the same. "Go on home" is a little more "folksy" and less formal.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    "Go on home" is not common in AusE. I agree it sounds folksy though. "Go on home, John Boy, y'hear?"

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    It makes it a little more gentle, if it's a command.
    Go home, Jim!
    Ah, Jim, don't you think it's time you went on home?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. huacunli's Avatar
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    #5

    Talking Re: re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Yes, the meaning is the same. "Go on home" is a little more "folksy" and less formal.
    Hi,
    Thanks for your reply with a new word of "folksy" which refresh me a lot and get me out of mess instantly.
    Thank you.

  5. huacunli's Avatar
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    #6

    Question Re: re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It makes it a little more gentle, if it's a command.
    Go home, Jim!
    Ah, Jim, don't you think it's time you went on home?
    Yeah, it's very kind of you to answer my post, but how should I understand the "go on home" in the following sentence
    of " well, I reckon I'll go on home". Is it also indicating the "gentle" manner for the subject Itself, right?

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    #7

    Re: re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Huacunli:

    I did some googling and am delighted to share my findings.

    (1) Sometimes "go on" = "continue."

    (a) This is from Alexandre Dumas's The Three Musketeers:

    "I did not go on, because it pleased me to stop here."

    "She called out cooly to the coachman, 'Go on -- home!' "

    (2) I also think that some people think that "Go on home" is a bit stronger than simply "Go home."

    (a) Here is a sentence from the novel Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill:

    "[H]e yelled at her, 'I told you to go on home! Now go, or I'll take a switch to you [beat her with something].' "

    (3) I can imagine this:

    Two cars collide. Dozens of people run to the scene to look. Two police officers arrive. Officer Smith says, "OK, folks. We need you to

    go home. Let the police and medical personnel do their jobs."

    But the crowd does not disperse. So the other officer might yell "Didn't you hear Officer Smith? Now go on home right now. Get out

    of here!"

  6. huacunli's Avatar
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    #8

    Smile Re: re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "Go on home" is not common in AusE. I agree it sounds folksy though. "Go on home, John Boy, y'hear?"
    hello,
    Thank you very much for your reply. It is from you that I know the usage of my thread above in AusE. I'll note this if I might arrive in Austrlia someday. Thank you, again

  7. huacunli's Avatar
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    #9

    Talking Re: re. Should I" go home " or "go on home"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Huacunli:

    I did some googling and am delighted to share my findings.

    (1) Sometimes "go on" = "continue."

    (a) This is from Alexandre Dumas's The Three Musketeers:

    "I did not go on, because it pleased me to stop here."

    "She called out cooly to the coachman, 'Go on -- home!' "

    (2) I also think that some people think that "Go on home" is a bit stronger than simply "Go home."

    (a) Here is a sentence from the novel Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill:

    "[H]e yelled at her, 'I told you to go on home! Now go, or I'll take a switch to you [beat her with something].' "

    (3) I can imagine this:

    Two cars collide. Dozens of people run to the scene to look. Two police officers arrive. Officer Smith says, "OK, folks. We need you to

    go home. Let the police and medical personnel do their jobs."

    But the crowd does not disperse. So the other officer might yell "Didn't you hear Officer Smith? Now go on home right now. Get out

    of here!"
    Hello, The parser:
    Thank you for your enthusiasm of googling and sharing your findings with me. Your reply is helpful to me with its multiple information which gets me know the French writer Alexandre Dumas and his works, The Three
    Musketeers;
    and the Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill, in addition to the instructive explanations I want. I will try to read them if I have time. Thank you, again

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