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    #1

    behind bars

    Hi

    Is the phrase "behind bars" an idiom or a phrasal verb?

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: behind bars

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Is the phrase "behind bars" an idiom or a phrasal verb?
    There is no verb involved. I do not even consider it to be an idiom. It's just an informal way of saying 'in prison'.

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    #3

    Re: behind bars

    How about "to be all in" meaning "exhausted". An idiom or a phrasal verb?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: behind bars

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    How about "to be all in" meaning "exhausted". An idiom or a phrasal verb?
    'All in' is an idiomatic expression meaning 'exhausted'. It functions here as an adjective.

    Phrasal verbs consist of a verb combining with a preposition/adverb/particle.

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    #5

    Re: behind bars

    Incidentally, there's an idiomatic phrase that's related (but less to do with prisoners) - 'under lock and key'. Someone who is behind bars could be said to be 'under lock and key', but so could anything of value. (I'm tired of saying - and I imagine readers are tired of hearing it - that, as with many metaphors that refer to technology the exact technology has often been superseded (there may be no 'key' involved).

    b

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: behind bars

    Incidentally, there's an idiomatic phrase that's related (but less to do with prisoners) - 'under lock and key'. Someone who is behind bars could be said to be 'under lock and key', but so could anything of value. (I'm tired of saying - and I imagine readers are tired of hearing it - that, as with many metaphors that refer to technology the exact technology has often been superseded (there may be no 'key' involved).

    b

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