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    #1

    diviant

    Let's say we have a teacher here. His way of teaching is very unique, totally different from those of ordinary teachers. If his students described him as a deviant, would you take the description as something positive (i.e He is different but good at teaching. And what he says in his class is worth listening to) or something negative (i.e. He is terrible at teaching and there is nothing to learn in his class)?

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: diviant

    It is inappropriate in the context of way of teaching - deviant.

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    #3

    Re: diviant

    Because the focus of 'deviant' is on behavior?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: diviant

    Especially on behaviour that is considered not morally correct.

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    #5

    Re: diviant

    The same is true of the adjective 'deviant' and the past particle 'deviated'? 'His way of teaching is deviant/deviated' sounds strange?

    The definition of the dictionary you provided says it is 'not considered normal'. Doesn't this 'not normal' mean 'unique' or 'different'?

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: diviant

    Taka, for most people, 'deviant', adjective or noun, suggests 'not morally correct'. That's it. If you used the word of a teacher, you would expect that he was behaving improperly with his students, not that he was a gifted but eccentric teacher, or one who had a unique teaching style.

    ps (later). Follow this link http://corpus.byu.edu/coca/, and enter 'deviant' in the search boxs. Just read the first couple of dozen citation - or more if you wish.
    Last edited by 5jj; 29-Apr-2012 at 10:53. Reason: ps added

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    #7

    Re: diviant

    Just as I thought.

    I mean, I wouldn't use that word to describe unique teaching styles. I happened to see a Japanese use it that way, and I wondered if it was really a good word to describe someone as gifted but eccentric.

    Thank you, 5jj!

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    #8

    Re: diviant

    'deviant' - pejorative, as 5jj has explained.
    'deviate' - value-free, neither good nor bad
    'deviation' - troublesome, if you're in a car

    b

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    #9

    Re: diviant

    PS - Please note that "very unique" is redundant. "Unique" does not have gradations.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 01-May-2012 at 01:09.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #10

    Re: diviant

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    PS - Please note that "very unique" is redundant. "Unique" does not have gradations.
    COCA seems to have a lot of examples of 'very unique', Barb.

    http://corpus.byu.edu/coca/x3.asp?xx...&w11=unique&r=

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