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  1. moonlike's Avatar
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    #1

    Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Hi

    Today somebody asked me if it's possible to replace these two or not? I checked both in dictionary and it was written they can be used for contrasting ideas, but to me it's not possible and I didn't know exactly how to justify my answer. Could you kindly help me? For example are these two sentences correct:
    1. Despite the heavy rain, I went out.
    2. unlike the heavy rain, I went out.

    Deep inside I reckon it's not possible, but as I said I couldn't find a good explanation for that.

    Thanks a million.
    Last edited by moonlike; 29-Apr-2012 at 20:13.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Absolutely not.
    How did the dictionary describe their use?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. moonlike's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Thanks.

    Unlike :(OALD/ the second meaning) :used to contrast somebody or something with another person or thing.
    Despite (sorry despite not despite of) :used to show that something happened or is true although something else might have happened to prevent it.
    I'm quite mixed up, you know because the equivalent of them in my first language is kind of close.
    Could you help me why exactly these two are not interchangeable?
    Thanks a lot.

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    #4

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Not a teacher

    1-Despite the heavy rain, I went out.
    2-Unlike the heavy rain, I went out.

    The first sentence is correct whereas the second is not.
    Unlike means not like but different from. She is funny unlike her brother..

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    #5

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Despite the heavy snow, I made it to work this morning, unlike many of my co-workers.
    Last edited by SoothingDave; 30-Apr-2012 at 02:02.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Despite: One thing happened. This is surprising or unexpected or somehow unlikely because of something else. X happened, despite Y. Or Despite Y, X happened/exists

    Despite your comments, I still think you like him.
    Despite the snow, I made it to work.
    I'm going to get my homework done tonight, despite how late it already is.
    Despite how many members of our family are good athletes, my brother is not at all athletic.

    Unlike: A simple contrast of two things.
    I am sad about this, unlike you.
    Unike you, who went to bed at 8:30, I got all my homework done.
    Unlike my sister, my brother is not at all athletic.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. moonlike's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Despite: One thing happened. This is surprising or unexpected or somehow unlikely because of something else. X happened, despite Y. Or Despite Y, X happened/exists

    Despite your comments, I still think you like him.
    Despite the snow, I made it to work.
    I'm going to get my homework done tonight, despite how late it already is.
    Despite how many members of our family are good athletes, my brother is not at all athletic.

    Unlike: A simple contrast of two things.
    I am sad about this, unlike you.
    Unike you, who went to bed at 8:30, I got all my homework done.
    Unlike my sister, my brother is not at all athletic.

    Fabulous! Thanks a lot Barb, you really helped me a lot.

    I'm going to get my homework done tonight, despite how late it already is.
    Despite how many members of our family are good athletes, my brother is not at all athletic.


    I wonder if it's possible to have a complete sentence after "despite", because as I've learned based on grammar books after "despite we need a noun, a noun phrase or gerund form of the verb? So can these sentences be right?
    • Despite it was raining heavily, I went out.
    • Despite the box had been in the house, she didn't know about it.

    Many Many thanks.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlike View Post
    I wonder if it's possible to have a complete sentence after "despite", because as I've learned based on grammar books after "despite we need a noun, a noun phrase or gerund form of the verb? So can these sentences be right?
    • Despite it was raining heavily, I went out.
    • Despite the box had been in the house, she didn't know about it.

    Many Many thanks.
    No. Despite the heavy rain,...
    Despite the presence of the box in the house,...
    Despite the box being in the house, ...
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. moonlike's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No. Despite the heavy rain,...
    Despite the presence of the box in the house,...
    Despite the box being in the house, ...
    Thanks. Sorry for being kind of picky, but is it possible to have a question form after that like the examples you mentioned already in post number six?

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Can we replace "despite of" with "unlike"?

    I don't understand your last question.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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