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    #1

    nor

    Dear Forum Users,

    I wonder if this sentence is correct (I highlighted the most problematic part):

    Since there is no academic consensus as to what ‘literal meaning’ constitutes, nor Kaufer defines it in his analysis, Kaufer's examples are vague.

    Thank you very much.

    Csika

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: nor

    That is not natural English. I prefer:

    Since there is no academic consensus as to what ‘literal meaning’ constitutes, and Kaufer does not define it in his analysis, Kaufer's examples are vague.

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    #3

    Re: nor

    Hi 5jj,

    Thank you.

    Should I insert 'either':

    Since there is no academic consensus as to what ‘literal meaning’ constitutes, and Kaufer does not define it in his analysis either, Kaufer's examples are vague.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: nor

    Quote Originally Posted by Csika View Post
    Dear Forum Users,

    I wonder if this sentence is correct (I highlighted the most problematic part):

    Since there is no academic consensus as to what ‘literal meaning’ constitutes, nor Kaufer defines it in his analysis, Kaufer's examples are vague.

    Thank you very much.

    Csika
    5JJ's version is better, but the original may just have a typo for

    Since there is no academic consensus as to what ‘literal meaning’ constitutes, nor does Kaufer define[no s] it in his analysis...
    But the end of the sentence - 'Kaufer's examples are vague' - makes this very clumsy.

    b

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    #5

    Re: nor

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    I believe that your sentence would be fine if you would remember to reverse the subject and verb after the conjunction "nor":

    Since there is no academic consensus as to what "literal meaning" constitutes, nor does he define it in his analysis, Kaufer's

    examples remain vague.

    (I believe that you should avoid mentioning Kaufer's surname twice in one sentence. As they say, it is "a bit much.")

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    #6

    Re: nor

    Thank you very much.

    Csika

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