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  1. anikoa's Avatar
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    #1

    Here is/are ten pounds.

    When I pay eg. at a restaurant and the bill is seven pounds, what should I say:
    Here is ten pounds.
    or
    Here are ten pounds.

    And if I would like to give one pound tip what should I say:
    Give me back two pounds.
    or
    You can have one pound for tip.
    or what?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: Here is/are ten pounds.

    NOT A TEACHER.

    "Here's ten pounds" = ungrammatical but perfectly acceptable in most situations

    "Here are ten pounds" = grammatical but probably less common than the above

    You could say, "You can have one pound as a tip." If you wanted to be 100% correct, you'd probably have to say, "You may have one pound as a tip."

  2. anikoa's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Here is/are ten pounds.

    Thank you very much.

  3. david11's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Here is/are ten pounds.

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen165 View Post
    NOT A TEACHER.

    "Here's ten pounds" = ungrammatical but perfectly acceptable in most situations

    ."
    I had a same doubt with regard to dealing with money.

    My doubt was:Is this forty? is this sentence grammatical? and I am told that it is grammatical.https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...835-forty.html


    If go by above sentence then would the following sentence also be correct?

    Is your cars costly?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Here is/are ten pounds.

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen165 View Post
    "Here's ten pounds" = ungrammatical but perfectly acceptable in most situations
    In British English, this is grammatically acceptable. We see the money as a single amount.
    "Here are ten pounds" = grammatical but probably less common than the above
    In British English this sounds very strange.
    At a restaurant, we normally don't say how much we are handing over. When the change is brought, we leave the tip.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Here is/are ten pounds.

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    ... would the following sentence also be correct?

    Is your cars costly?
    No. I don't know exactly what you want to say, but 'cars' is plural, not an amount.

  6. david11's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Here is/are ten pounds.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    No. I don't know exactly what you want to say, but 'cars' is plural, not an amount.
    Then what about the product which we buy is in plural.

    Five chocolates.

    Is this forty?

    we know that this represents five chocolates(i.e.plural) but we use is.Why?

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Here is/are ten pounds.

    Please start a new thread for this question, David. You've hijacked the original poster's question about handling money.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Here is/are ten pounds.

    Just last weekend, I was in a situation (a taxi) when I wanted the person to deduct his tip from what he gave me. The total was $11.50. I was going to round it up to $15.00. I gave him a $20 bill.

    There's no need to say "Here is $20." He could see that. I just said "Could I get $5 back in change, please?" He understood that the $3.50 was for him.

    So in handing over a ten-pound note for a seven-pound bill with the intention of tipping only one pound, you could say something like "I just need two pounds back, please."

    But it doesn't take that much longer to receive all of your change and select what you want to return to the person as his tip.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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