Results 1 to 5 of 5

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 109
    #1

    with some over

    "My memory goes back pretty clearly to my third year, and by then I had so many of the toy lead animals you could buy in shops that they went right round our flat-topped fireplace fender, nose to tail, with some over."

    1. Please explain what is "with some over".
    2. Why the writer didn't write "lead toy animal" instead of "toy lead animals"? Does the former sound more natural to you too? Is there any rule about the order of adjectives?

    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 43
    #2

    Re: with some over

    1. they were nose to tail, and some were nose over tail.
    2. yes there is an order. see this thread. "lead toy animal" would be more correct. this must have been written a long time ago because toys are not (supposed) to be made from lead!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Oct 2005
    • Posts: 97
    #3

    Re: with some over

    "With some over", means. "He had so many toys, that when placed end to end round the fireplace that he had SOME LEFT OVER" There to many toys to fit. Look at the context at the above explanation is DEFINATELY correct.


    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 43
    #4

    Re: with some over

    hmm, the first time I read it I got that they were nose to tail, and some were nose over tail, meaning they were crammed all together there were so many. some left over makes sense too, but I have never seen "with some over" used to mean some "with some left over."

  1. #5

    Re: with some over

    Hi,

    Hobbes is correct - with some over is a fairly common usage.

    Mike

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •