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    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 109
    #1

    to have said

    "Do not commit yourself to something which may injure us both to have said."

    I understand "do not commit yourself to something which may injure us both" perfectly well; but I can't see where "to have said" came from; I'm curious to learn what's the use of "to have said".

    Thanks.
    Last edited by MadHorse; 06-Dec-2005 at 15:15.

  1. #2

    Re: to have said

    "Do not commit yourself to something which may injure us both to have said."

    As an english speaker, I agree with you, I can't understand the sentence.

    "To have said" is a normal expression (Archimedes is rumoured to have said "Eureka") but it doesn't make sense in the context quoted.

    Mike

    • Member Info
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    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #3

    Re: to have said

    There is a possibility that this could be a causative structure:
    Don't commit yourself to something that may injure us both to have said (=if it becomes public knowledge, if people go around saying it)
    That's the only way I could explain the sentence, and I think I am stretching the boundaries a bit to do it.


    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 109
    #4

    Re: to have said

    Mike and tdol,

    Thank you very much.

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