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    #1

    Apostrophes

    Its a very basic question and i should definitely know this :S

    I know that you add an apostrophe for That's instead of That is or There's instead of There is, But the rule for possession is whats confusing me.

    From what i recall, when its a persons name, you don't add an apostrophe. I think

    This is the sentence I need a bit of clarification on:

    The Millerís Tale and The General Prologue is a small section of Geoffrey Chaucersí
    So, In that, Its showing possession of the poems, (Which is usually Chaucer's?) But where multiple possession is implied, do you have it as "Chaucers'"?

    I've never been the best with correct grammar and MS word is being very confusing. Tempted to turn it off!


    I'm trying to do this for a relatively important essay, so i can't afford errors :S


    Cheers

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    #2

    Re: Apostrophes

    As I understand it, the only time you would find -s' is in a plural noun that already ends in -s, as in:

    'The Thompsons' dog is playing outside.' (the dog belong to the Thompson family)
    'The horses' saddles are in the barn.' (the saddles belonging to all of the horses)

    So "Chaucers' poems" is saying there are several Chaucers. '... Small section of Geoffrey Chaucer's' is the small section of works by the one Geoffrey Chaucer. I think this is made even clearer if you imagined another word at the end, like in 'a small section of Geoffrey Chaucer's works.'

    Actually I just now read that you also find -s' in singular personal names that end in -s, where you don't pronounce an extra 's' when saying the possessive in spoken language, like in

    'Jeff Bridges' latest film'

    (not a teacher, just a language lover)

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    #3

    Re: Apostrophes

    So it would be appropriate to use Chaucers'? Or is there a better way i could do it?

    Full sentence is:

    The Miller’s Tale and The General Prologue is a small section of Geoffrey Chaucers’ complete work, The Canterbury Tales.

    Ok, after reading it to myself for the hundredth time, I think Chaucer's is probably the best way to do it......

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    #4

    Re: Apostrophes

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    So it would be appropriate to use Chaucers'? Or is there a better way i could do it?

    Full sentence is:




    Ok, after reading it to myself for the hundredth time, I think Chaucer's is probably the best way to do it......
    Right, if it's a singular personal name that does not end in -s, then the possessive is 's.


    (not a teacher, just a language lover)

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    #5

    Re: Apostrophes

    Cheers :)

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    #6

    Re: Apostrophes

    Hanibal, there are several Similar Threads below which you should find helpful.

    Rover

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    #7

    Re: Apostrophes

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    I've never been the best with correct grammar and MS word is being very confusing. Tempted to turn it off!
    They've never really sorted this out. The spellcheck tools are great, but they've not made much progress in grammar.

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    #8

    Re: Apostrophes

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    It's a very basic question and i should definitely know this :S

    I know that you add an apostrophe for That's instead of That is or There's instead of There is, But the rule for possession is what's confusing me.

    From what i recall, when it's a person's name, you don't add an apostrophe. I think

    This is the sentence I need a bit of clarification on:



    So, In that, It's showing possession of the poems, (Which is usually Chaucer's?) But where multiple possession is implied, do you have it as "Chaucers'"?

    I've never been the best with correct grammar and MS word is being very confusing. Tempted to turn it off!


    I'm trying to do this for a relatively important essay, so i can't afford errors :S


    Cheers
    [AmE - not a teacher]

    See above

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    #9

    Re: Apostrophes

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post


    I'm trying to do this for a relatively important essay, so i can't afford errors



    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Hanibal:


    I am confident that you will earn a very good mark on your "important essay."

    But I am very worried. You seem to think that it is only necessary to capitalize the personal pronoun "I" at the

    beginning of a sentence. But in English, we ALWAYS capitalize "I." (I realize that this is not the case in many

    other languages.) If you do not always capitalize "I," I am afraid that your teacher will be quite upset.


    HAVE A NICE DAY!

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