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    #1

    will

    Hello,

    When you are talking about the future, we do not use will after as long as/ provided/ providing/ so long as/ whereas. (In the main clause)


    Can we include 'on condition that and suppose/supposing that' also?

    On condition that I will..........
    Suppose that I will............

    Thanks....

  1. CarloSsS's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: will

    Not a teacher

    Yes, "on condition (that)" and "suppose/supposing" fall within the same category as the ones you mentioned. That is, in most cases, there is no "will" after them even though the main clause has a feature meaning.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: will

    Quote Originally Posted by CarloSsS View Post
    Not a teacher

    Yes, "on condition (that)" and "suppose/supposing" fall within the same category as the ones you mentioned. That is, in most cases, there is no "will" after them even though the main clause has a feature meaning.
    I expect you meant 'future' - no doubt knowing that /fju:ʧə/ - unlike 'suture' - has a /ju:/ !

    b

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: will

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    When you are talking about the future, we do not use will after as long as/ provided/ providing/ so long as/ whereas.
    Note that it is possible to use will in the conditional clause:

    1. We’re going to take strike action if they won’t give us a rise.
    2. If you will come with me, I’ll take you to the meeting.
    3. Provided that you will pay my expenses, I'll drive you to Edinburgh



    In #1, the use of [the negative form of] will implies that the speaker considers their present or future refusal [this will be made clear from context] as an annoying or wilful characteristic.


    In #2 and #3, will implies a willingness on the part of the person addressed to comply with the speaker’s request.


    So, we can use will with certain meanings in the conditional clause. However, it would be illogical to use will with the meaning of certainty [or indeed may with the meaning of possibility] in a clause in which IF itself implies possibility/uncertainty. This is why we do not produce such utterances as:

    4. *If it will rain tomorrow, we will stay at home.

    and why [5] can normally indicate only willingness on Wendy’s part, not certainty:

    5. So long as Wendy will write the report, I won’t need Jim.


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