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    #1

    Can "buff" be substituted with "fan"?

    My dictioinary gives me the definitions:
    Fan: an ardent follower and admirer.
    Buff: an ardent follower and admirer.

    They look absolutely same.

    Context:

    Shelby's death was taken hard by the many auto industry veterans and auto buffs who knew him personally, or only via his cars.

  1. FreeToyInside's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Can "buff" be substituted with "fan"?

    In AmE usage, a buff is generally more involved in the activity or thing that you're talking about than a fan.

    I've not heard of a 'car fan', but a 'racing fan' would be somebody who likes to go to races and watch them on TV. A 'car buff' is somebody who knows about car makes and models, can probably tell you the difference between a 67 and a 68 Ford Mustang, probably knows the inner workings of a car, likes all things related to cars.

    Similarly, a 'movie fan' is somebody who likes to watch movies. A 'movie buff' could probably name every film with a particular actor, the years those movies came out, who directed them, etc. Buffs are generally more involved, have a deeper interest in the thing you're talking about.


    (not a teacher, just a language lover)

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Can "buff" be substituted with "fan"?

    Quote Originally Posted by FreeToyInside View Post
    Similarly, a 'movie fan' is somebody who likes to watch movies. A 'movie buff' could probably name every film with a particular actor, the years those movies came out, who directed them, etc. Buffs are generally more involved, have a deeper interest in the thing you're talking about.


    I would call myself a film (BrE) fan and, specifically a western buff.

    I have been called a western anorak. (definition 2)

  3. FreeToyInside's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Can "buff" be substituted with "fan"?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post


    I would call myself a film (BrE) fan and, specifically a western buff.

    I have been called a western anorak. (definition 2)

    Actually, a true 'film buff' in the US would probably take offense to being called a 'movie buff'. They're always the first ones to point out that 'that's not a movie, it's a film.' In their estimation:
    movie = Hollywood cookie-cutter plot with awful dialogue and lots of explosions
    film = artsy stuff, with substance

    (not a teacher, just a language lover)

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    #5

    Re: Can "buff" be substituted with "fan"?

    Quote Originally Posted by FreeToyInside View Post
    Actually, a true 'film buff' in the US would probably take offense to being called a 'movie buff'. They're always the first ones to point out that 'that's not a movie, it's a film.' In their estimation:
    movie = Hollywood cookie-cutter plot with awful dialogue and lots of explosions
    film = artsy stuff, with substance
    I wasn't aware of the distinction in AmE.

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