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    #1

    How to use "than"?

    Hi,
    Which sentences below are correct? If all the sentences are wrong or natural, could you please give me a proper way with "than" to say that? Many thanks.


    1. We want to recruit a person who has more experience than the man who just resigned (has).
    2. We want to recruit a more experienced person than the resigned (has).
    3. We want to recruit a person with more experience than the resigned man(has).

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: How to use "than"?

    Only the first works. You can end with 'has' , though 'had' is more likely, or you can omit that verb altogether.

  2. LeighS's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: How to use "than"?

    We want to recruit a person who has more experience than the man who has just resigned.
    We want to recruit a person who has more experience than the man who resigned.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: How to use "than"?

    We don't call someone who has resigned from their job "the resigned man". When we use "resigned" before a noun like this, it means that that person has resigned themselves to something (ie they have unwillingly accepted a situation).

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    #5

    Re: How to use "than"?

    Thank you, everyone.
    If possible, please help me confirm one more sentence, thanks a lot.
    ---We want to recruit a person with more experience than the man who has resigned has.
    "has" in this sentence is necessary, right?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: How to use "than"?

    No. It's the same answer as I gave in post #2.
    You can end with 'has' , though 'had' is more likely, or you can omit that verb altogether.

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    #7

    Re: How to use "than"?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    No. It's the same answer as I gave in post #2.
    Thanks, Sir.
    I am not very clear why "has" can be omited, since there are no word, "has" in the clause before "than".
    I find a similar sentence in a book.
    ---I have more books than you.
    The book told me that ' I have more book than you=I have more book than the book which you have. To avoid repeating the word, " have" shold be omited or use "do" instead.
    Back to my sentence, I use "with" rather than "have", why we can omit it.
    ---We want to recruit a person with more experience than the experience which the man who has resigned has.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: How to use "than"?

    The man who resigned was a man with limited experience. We want to recruit a man with more experience (than the limited experience of the other man). The verb HAVE is not part of this. The 'possession' of the experience is shown by the preposition with.

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