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    #1

    you too

    THE bOY *SAYS 'NICE TO MEET YOU' AND THE GIRL ANSWERS 'YOU TOO'. WHY?!I THINK 'ME TOO' IS CORRET.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: you too

    Please don't use all capitals to post.

    You can think of it as "Me too" as in "that applies to me too -- I also find it nice to meet you."
    Or you can think of it as "You too" as in "it was nice to meet you too."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: you too

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    THE bOY *SAYS 'NICE TO MEET YOU' AND THE GIRL ANSWERS 'YOU TOO'. WHY?!I THINK 'ME TOO' IS CORRECT.
    If the girl said 'me too', she would be saying that she thought it was nice to meet herself, which makes no sense. We take 'You too' to mean "(It is) nice (for me) to meet you, too", which is appropriate.

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    #4

    Re: you too

    Not a teacher

    I wonder which of the following responses is natural?

    A: I need money.
    B: Me too/you too

    Thanks for your help.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: you too

    And in this second example, which makes sense? How can you create a full sentence to support a shorter answer?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: you too

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    And in this second example, which makes sense? How can you create a full sentence to support a shorter answer?
    Thanks a lot, Barb_D

    Does it mean that if a sentence with an object 'you', for example 'I miss you', we should say, "you too"?

    Thanks again.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: you too

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Does it mean that if a sentence with an object 'you', for example 'I miss you', we should say, "you too"?
    It's 'no' to the 'should'.

    The simplest answer to all these questions is that only when the second speaker is presenting a situation in which they are the subject of the same verb action as the first speaker is 'me too' a clear and appropriate response:

    1. A: I like meeting people.
    B: Me too (+ I, too like meeting people.)
    / You too.

    2. A: I need money
    B: Me too (= I, too, like meeting people.)
    / You too.


    When we have a situation in which the subject of the first speaker's uttterance is 'it', which may be implied, the 'me too' is not a clear response;

    3. A: (It was) nice to meet you.
    B: ?Me too./ ?You too


    However, as Barb said, these forms may be heard in informal speech. I happen to think that 'me too' is even more meaningless than 'you too', but agree that some people say it. Context makes it reasonably clear what is meant.


    When a direct object is mentioned, 'you too' is possible in such situations as:

    4. A: Peter likes you.
    B: You too (Peter likes you, too).


    As Barb suggested, think what the full sentence might be to see if your shortened version works.

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    #8

    Re: you too

    I'm really sorry. There was something wrong with my system and I had to use capital letters.

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