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    #1

    He got off/away with a warning...

    He got off/away with a warning, but no second chance would be given if he was caught again.

    Is 'away' the correct choice?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 19-May-2012 at 19:14. Reason: typo

  1. CarloSsS's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He got off/away with a warning...

    NOT A TEACHER

    Yes, it is. For more info on the meaning of the phrasal verb "get away with" see http://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionar...+with#get__208
    Last edited by CarloSsS; 19-May-2012 at 19:20.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: He got off/away with a warning...

    I'm going to make an argument for the potential use of "got off" here. If someone is in trouble for something, he/she stands the chance of being subjected to several different punishments or to none. For my example, I will use someone who has been stopped by the police while driving and found to have been drinking alcohol.

    Mr Smith was arrested on Saturday night for drink-driving. He was found to be twice over the legal alcohol limit. He was kept in police cells overnight and appeared in court on Sunday morning. The judge had several choices: imprison him, ban him from driving, fine him or release him with only a warning. Mr Smith was very lucky. The judge was in a good mood, considered the fact that it was Mr Smith's first offence and decided on the latter punishment. So Mr Smith got off with a warning.

    Basically, he "got off" because he was not jailed, banned or fined. He was let go after a warning not to do it again.

  3. CarloSsS's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: He got off/away with a warning...

    I see your point. Then I guess both can be used with little to no difference in meaning.

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    #5

    Re: He got off/away with a warning...

    I, too, would use "got off." You get away with murder. You get off with a warning. Or got off on a technicality.

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    #6

    Re: He got off/away with a warning...

    I would use "get away" in my own example of drink-driving if the person hadn't been stopped by the police at all. In that context, he managed to drink and then drive home without being caught in which case he "got away with it".

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