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  1. moonlike's Avatar
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    #1

    Question What is the comparative form of this adverb? " She behaves in a friendly way"

    Hi
    In order to compare adverbs we are supposed to add "er" or sometimes "more". How about the adverbs in this form "in a ....way/manner"? For example, in a friendly way, in a motherly manner. Could you tell me what the comparative form of them is? Should we add "ier"? Should we say she behaves friendlier than him, or she acts motherlier than her friend? Is there a special rule in this regard?
    Thanks a lot

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What is the comparative form of this adverb? " She behaves in a friendly way"

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlike View Post
    Hi
    In order to compare adverbs we are supposed to add "er" or sometimes "more". How about the adverbs in this form "in a ....way/manner"? For example, in a friendly way, in a motherly manner. Could you tell me what the comparative form of them is? Should we add "ier"? Should we say she behaves friendlier than him, or she acts motherlier than her friend? Is there a special rule in this regard?
    Thanks a lot
    "friendlier" is fine "motherlier" isn't.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: What is the comparative form of this adverb? " She behaves in a friendly way"

    Annoyingly, many comparatives simply have to be learnt. There is no hard and fast rule about which take "er" and which are simply "more + adjective". The same goes for adjectives which end -ly. Some can take both but in a slightly different form:

    He behaved in a friendly way.
    He behaved in a more friendly way.
    He was friendlier.

    She is motherly.
    She behaved in a motherly way.
    She is more motherly than her sister.
    She behaved in more motherly way than her sister.
    As bhai said, "motherlier" doesn't exist.

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