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    #1

    Smile comparative

    Hello


    Is there any difference? Are these sentences replaceable?

    (A) Your car doesn't run faster than mine.
    (B) Your car doesn't run as fast as mine.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: comparative

    They are not the same. The first means that your car cannot beat the speed of mine although it may be able to match the speed. The second means that your car cannot even match the speed of mine, it can only run more slowly.

    For information, in BrE, we usually say a car "goes" fast or slow, not "runs".

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: comparative

    Hi, Jstudent. Thank you for the helpful post.
    And thank you, too, emsr2d2.
    The difference between the two examples above is confusing to many Japanese students.

    I'd like to ask an additional question here.

    I think 'Your car goes(runs) no faster than mine.' is grammatical.
    If I understand it correctly, it means something like :
    "What? Your car goes faster than mine? No! That's impossible!"

    Am I correct?

    Thank you in advance!

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hi, Jstudent. Thank you for the helpful post.
    And thank you, too, emsr2d2.
    The difference between the two examples above is confusing to many Japanese students.

    I'd like to ask an additional question here.

    I think 'Your car goes(runs) no faster than mine.' is grammatical.
    If I understand it correctly, it means something like :
    "What? Your car goes faster than mine? No! That's impossible!"

    Am I correct?

    Thank you in advance!
    No. "Your car goes no faster than mine" means exactly what it says. It goes "no faster", so it does not go faster. It might go as fast (ie the same speed) but is not go any faster than mine.

  4. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    No. "Your car goes no faster than mine" means exactly what it says. It goes "no faster", so it does not go faster. It might go as fast (ie the same speed) but is not go any faster than mine.
    Thank you,emsr2d2, and bhaisahab. You saved my life!

    Well, I fully understand what you mean.
    What I was trying to say in the previous post is that...(I don't really know how to express this idea of mine in English, but it's something like...)'no' is much stronger than 'not' when it is used in the comparative structure. Do you see what I mean?

    Please look at the three sentences below.

    1. A is 100 centimeters long.
    2. B is 95 centimeters long.
    3. C is 1 centimeter long.

    Of course, I understand that B and C are not longer than A and that they are not as(so) long as A.

    According to the strange idea of mine, #2 and #3 are(or have been) interpreted as :


    4. B is not longer than A.
    5. C is no longer than A. (I'm not sure if this sentence is grammatical. I've never seen one like this...)


    If I read #4 without any context (#1-#3), I would think that… B is (maybe a little, maybe much, I don’t know) shorter than A, or that… it could be as long as A.
    As for #5, without any context (#1-#3), I would assume that…C is far shorter than A. This is because of my strange idea that " 'no' is much stronger than 'not' when it is used in the comparative structure."

    However…, it (my idea) is wrong. #4 and #5 mean the same.
    Do I understand you correctly?

    Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 22-May-2012 at 16:26.

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